Marine

Floating off-grid home looks fit for a Bond villain

Floating off-grid home looks f...
Anthénea is on the market for US$535,000
Anthénea is on the market for US$535,000
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Anthénea gets power from roof-based solar panels
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Anthénea gets power from roof-based solar panels
Anthénea measures 50 sq m (538 sq ft)
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Anthénea measures 50 sq m (538 sq ft)
Anthénea is accessed by a hatch-like lifting door
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Anthénea is accessed by a hatch-like lifting door
Anthénea is on the market for US$535,000
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Anthénea is on the market for US$535,000
Anthénea's downstairs has a bed and a bathroom
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Anthénea's downstairs has a bed and a bathroom
Anthénea includes a bathroom with two sinks and a bathtub
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Anthénea includes a bathroom with two sinks and a bathtub
Anthénea's upstairs area has seating for up to 12 people
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Anthénea's upstairs area has seating for up to 12 people

French naval architect Jean-Michel Duacancelle was inspired to create Anthénea after watching the James Bond movie The Spy Who Loved Me. The floating dwelling certainly looks like the kind of place that a Bond villain would choose to live in and has some nice features including an underwater window and solar power.

Bringing to mind the UFO 2.0, the Anthénea was originally envisioned as a hotel or spa, but can also be outfitted for use as a home.

The model shown measures 50 sq m (538 sq ft). It's accessed by a raising hatch door and visitors find a living area on the ground floor that has a sofa, a minibar, and a window offering views of the sea life below.

Elsewhere on the ground floor is a circular bed and a bathroom which includes two sinks and a bathtub. Stairs lead up to a "relaxation area" that seats up to a dozen people on a circular sofa.

Anthénea's downstairs has a bed and a bathroom
Anthénea's downstairs has a bed and a bathroom

We've no word on the insulation that's installed in the Anthénea's fiberglass shell, though its creator says that it can handle an impressive temperature range of -30° C to 40° C (-22° F to 104° F), so should be up to scratch. Additionally, it includes a solar panel system for all electricity needs.

Optional extras include a desalination system that turns seawater into drinking water, a wood-burning stove, air-conditioning, and a generator for backup power. If the Anthénea is to be used as a hotel, it's towed into position, with optional thrusters for maneuvering, but if it's going to be used as a home, it's fitted with electric thrusters that provide a rather sedate maximum speed of 5 knots (5.5 mph/9.26 km/h) as standard.

The recently-completed Anthénea model pictured is currently located in Brittany, France, and is on the market for US$535,000.

Source: Anthénea

6 comments
mediabeing
Where's the rest of it? For half a million, I SURE WOULD expect MORE square footage! No deal.
Douglas Rogers
This would make a really good earthquake proof house by setting it in sand or pea gravel.
minivini
Half the cost or double the square footage. Seriously.
Trylon
That doesn't look anything like Stromberg's Atlantis base. More like the small lifepod that Bond and Triple-X escaped in. Now if Duacancelle really wanted to impress me, he would adapt a decommissioned supertanker to be a home.
dwreid
The home appears to have solar cells on only one side of a round floating "house". Unless there is a way to orient the home, they will not charge if the home is facing the wrong way.
ljaques
Wow, only a thousand dollars a square foot! Half a thousand square feet, half a million dollars. The question is: What's the stability for that size/weight platform in waves from wind or watercraft?