Marine

World's most powerful electric outboard pushing for world speed record

World's most powerful electric...
Vision Marine technologies is offering the E-Motion 180E outboard for preorder now
Vision Marine technologies is offering the E-Motion 180E outboard for preorder now
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Vision Marine technologies is offering the E-Motion 180E outboard for preorder now
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Vision Marine technologies is offering the E-Motion 180E outboard for preorder now
Vision teams with Miami power catamaran builder Hellkats Powerboats on the dual-motored Fulgura
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Vision teams with Miami performance boatbuilder Hellkats Powerboats on the dual-motored Fulgura l

Back in May, Vision Marine Technologies opened reservations for its all-electric E-Motion 180E outboard, offering boaters the opportunity to equip their vessels with a cleaner, quieter breed of propulsion. Not only is the 180E the world's most powerful electric outboard, but it could soon become the world's fastest. Vision has teamed up with Hellkats Powerboats in an effort to push the all-out electric boat world speed record up over 100 mph (161 km/h).

A year ago, Norwegian company Evoy announced its 150-hp Pro outboard engine as the world's most powerful electric outboard, promising buyers a combination of ultra-quiet, zero-emissions cruising and horsepower they could drop on the back of their boats. The Pro is available now, and Evoy plans to add 300- and 450-hp variants in the future.

Before those more powerful Evoy Pro units get to market, though, Vision Marine is sneaking in and wresting the "world's most powerful" title from Evoy's tense, white knuckles, shipping it over the North Atlantic to Quebec, Canada. Along with its 180 hp, Vision's high-voltage E-Motion 180E tops the Evoy Pro in torque with 288 lb-ft (390 Nm). The E-Motion 180E is meant to be swapped out with a gas outboard of the same output, and Vision suspects most such boats will range between 18 and 26 ft (5.5 and 7.9 m).

Range will ultimately depend heavily upon the design of the boat itself, weight, weather conditions and other wide-ranging factors that aren't easily compounded into a neat figure, but Vision loosely estimates that the 180E could power a compatible boat up to 70 miles (113 km) while cruising at 20 mph (32 km/h). With no mention of the DC fast-charging capability that Evoy plans, Vision's battery takes a full overnight to charge from a 220-V outlet.

Vision steps beyond the "world's most powerful e-outboard motor" title, teaming with Miami-based Hellkats for a run at the world's fastest electric boat title. The partnership will create an all-electric version of Hellkats' 32-ft (9.8-m) Super-Sport Widebody catamaran called the Fulgura l. The boat will be powered by dual E-Motion outboards, and plans call for it to hit the water in November.

Vision teams with Miami power catamaran builder Hellkats Powerboats on the dual-motored Fulgura
Vision teams with Miami performance boatbuilder Hellkats Powerboats on the dual-motored Fulgura l

Vision estimates that the Fulgura will be able to top 100 mph (87 knots/161 km/h), more than enough to leapfrog the 88.6-mph (142.6-km/h) mark Jaguar Vector Racing set in 2018 with its Formula E-powered water rocket. We've seen another electric speedboat with estimated 100-mph capability make it as far as the trade show floor, but the highlighter-colored 2,200-hp Mercedes-AMG Cigarette Top Gun never proved its mettle on open water.

The average E-Motion 180E buyer won't be looking to set new world speed records but will benefit from the universal advantages of electric boat motor design: emissions/odor-free cruising, near-silent operation, and greatly decreased maintenance and fuel costs. Vision also says the electric drive is more responsive than a gas outboard.

Of course, those benefits do not come without their cost. The full E-Motion 180E package prices in at a cool $78,990 – and that's US dollars, not Canadian. That breaks down to $26,995 for the motor and $51,995 for the battery, charger and user interface kit. The hefty price tag doesn't look quite so expensive next to the NOK698,000 (approx. US$83,900) price of the Evoy Pro with 63-kWh battery pack, but either way, it's a lot of money. At least the $300 reservation fee seems affordable enough.

No speed records set below, but the video does show the E-Motion 180E making things happen on the water.

E-Motion Electric Outboard Series 180E

Source: Vision Marine

8 comments
8 comments
Peter Forte
Given the inevitability of a full abandonment of fossil-fuels (at least, in their present formulation) one would wish for more emphasis on real-world applications of electric propulsion. Boating, either as a recreational exercise or as a commercial endeavour, is primarily concerned with service time - the ability to operate for long periods. I suppose that this exercise was never intended to answer those questions. This, after all, is a pleasure craft, a very pleasurable craft!
Nobody
Nothing about operating voltage, total weight and very general mention of range. Many 18 foot flatter bottom boats would be on plane at 20mph but most 26 foot v-hull boats would not. Most gas powered boats in this size range and horsepower get between .5 and 1.5 mile per gallon. Also nothing was mentioned about electricity hazards and salt water. On the ocean in heavy seas, it is not unusual for the waves to occasionally wash over top of an outboard. Even a sudden stop in calm water could have the wake half submerge the motor. I also don't remember any marinas having 220 volt shore power, only 110 volt with locking plugs. For electric power on the water, I will stick to my low voltage trolling motor.
minivini
I get that everything boating-adjacent is unreasonably costly, but c’mon.

That said, my ideal day tripper would be an Axopar 27 Cabin with a gas outboard flanked by two EV outboards. That reminds me - need to pick up some lottery tickets today 😜
Bob B
I see electric outboards like this using standard lower units, probably because that reduces the amount of engineering needed to get to market, but I wonder if some improvements could be made there. I'm thinking something along the lines of a propeller with adjustable pitch blades that could act as a transmission of sorts. That would allow the electric motor to stay lower in the RPM range. I'm not any kind of engineer, so I really don't know if that would have any real benefits, but it might make for even quieter operation.
*Joe*
You can get a 175HP Evinrude outboard for $10k and 300HP for $15k. For the price of an 180E, you can have twin 300HP outboards for $50k for gas. Is the 180E made of plywood?
michael_dowling
I sent the company an email bitching about the loud music in the promo video,and they sent me a link to a short video showing it running with only ambient sound,all within a couple of hours! I guess they don't want to tick off potential customers. Not wimpy sounding at all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9Ww5F9vIh0
SpudWahene
How much of the boat in the video is occupied by the battery? $78k, plus installation. Yipes. Few people care about powering another super speedy boat. Though the only people who could afford such an outboard, might also be the only ones who care.
Towerman
@nobody
The motors are obviously sealed that is a basic engineering feat. Electric motors are super reliable. I would not have think twice given a choice between this electric motor and an ICE motor, electric motors wins ! however the price of the e-motor and powersytem plus batteries is lunacy.