Military

Rook 6x6 military UGV autonomously traverses rough terrain

Rook 6x6 military UGV autonomo...
The Rook has a top speed of 30 km/h (19 mph) and can run for eight hours per charge of its battery pack
The Rook has a top speed of 30 km/h (19 mph) and can run for eight hours per charge of its battery pack
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The Rook's modular design allows its parts to be replaced on location, without the need for specially trained technicians
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The Rook's modular design allows its parts to be replaced on location, without the need for specially trained technicians
Among other applications, the Rook can be used to evacuate casualties from the battlefield
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Among other applications, the Rook can be used to evacuate casualties from the battlefield
The Rook has 24 cm (9.4 in) of ground clearance
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The Rook has 24 cm (9.4 in) of ground clearance
The Rook has a top speed of 30 km/h (19 mph) and can run for eight hours per charge of its battery pack
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The Rook has a top speed of 30 km/h (19 mph) and can run for eight hours per charge of its battery pack
The Rook can deploy an optional drone
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The Rook can deploy an optional drone
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We're seeing an increasing number of robotic devices that are created to perform tasks which would put soldiers in danger, or take them away from other more important duties. The Rook UGV (Unmanned Ground Vehicle) is one of the latest, and it features full-time six-wheel-drive.

Designed from scratch to serve as a military-standard electric UGV, the Rook is the result of a collaboration between Israeli defense firm Elbit Systems and US-based Unmanned Ground Vehicle manufacturer Roboteam.

Some of its possible uses include the delivery of supplies, evacuation of casualties, plus intelligence-gathering missions performed with help from a deployable multicopter drone … and yes, it can also be equipped with weapons. Its modular design allows its parts to be replaced on location, without the need for specially trained technicians.

Among other applications, the Rook can be used to evacuate casualties from the battlefield
Among other applications, the Rook can be used to evacuate casualties from the battlefield

The Rook navigates pre-programmed routes and avoids obstacles utilizing Elbit's Torch-X RAS (Robotic and Autonomous) sensory/communications system. It's also able to track and follow soldiers walking in front of it, form conveys with other Rooks, or be remotely controlled in real time – the latter is performed using a weatherproof ruggedized 7-inch portable display unit.

The vehicle itself weighs 1,200 kg (2,646 lb), can carry that same amount, offers 24 cm (9.4 in) of ground clearance, and has a top speed of 30 km/h (19 mph). One charge of its battery pack should reportedly be good for up to eight hours of use. It can additionally be equipped with an onboard generator, to power or charge other electric devices in the field.

You can see it in action, in the video below.

Elbit Systems / ROOK

Source: Elbit Systems

View gallery - 5 images
7 comments
7 comments
Ornery Johnson
"I AM THE LAW." -Robocop
vince
What a waste of sciencetific input on such a silly device. The probably want $2 million for each of them too.
Daishi
This is part of the problem with military contracts and military industrial complex. I remember saying people were wasting their time back when they wanted to use the Boston Robotics AlphaDog for this. This is closer but the middle wheels don't serve any purpose that couldn't be accomplished with 4 regular slightly larger diameter wheels. The other issue is the airless tires they are using would perform terrible in environments where mud and rocks can seep in from the sides. An off the shelf ATV would outperform it in offroading, speed, reliability, and cost. They target the military because they know the design would need to actually be viable to succeed in the consumer market.
HoppyHopkins
While I would find a robotic mule or horse to carry equipment and a robot dog for K-9 services, just as long as they were cosmetically designed to look the part. I am totally against robotic self programming armed platforms that are capable of independent action without immediate human control or ability to countermand that course of action. An AI to aid human use of tanks or jets would be useful, but we don't need to create the beginnings pf a Terminator
EH
Weight is at least double what it should be. It's basically a golf cart. It is slower than a decent bicycle. Eight hour range is not great, considering it should have nearly half a ton of batteries. It should be capable of crossing rivers, but isn't. When the battery gets hit by a bullet, it's going to short out and become a giant, unquenchable fire.
ljaques
That looks like a wheeled ripoff (or licensing of) Milrem's tracked THeMIS platform. THeMIS is hybrid diesel/electric which is better, IMHO.
ReservoirPup
great music. thanx