Motorcycles

Revan uses helmet HUD to check blind spots

Revan uses helmet HUD to check...
Looking down onto the helmet-mounted Revan camera module, which is reportedly compatible with a wide range of third-party helmets
Looking down onto the helmet-mounted Revan camera module, which is reportedly compatible with a wide range of third-party helmets
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A close-up view of the Revan camera module
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A close-up view of the Revan camera module
Looking down onto the helmet-mounted Revan camera module, which is reportedly compatible with a wide range of third-party helmets
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Looking down onto the helmet-mounted Revan camera module, which is reportedly compatible with a wide range of third-party helmets
The Revan battery unit (with removable batteries) mounts on the back of the helmet, and is hard-wired to the camera module
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The Revan battery unit (with removable batteries) mounts on the back of the helmet, and is hard-wired to the camera module
The Revan handlebar remote
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The Revan handlebar remote
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When you're changing lanes on a motorcycle while wearing a full-face helmet, performing shoulder checks can be difficult. The Revan "dashcam" system is designed to help, by providing users with a heads-up display (HUD) of their blind spots.

At the heart of the setup is a low-profile dual-camera module, that gets mounted on top of a third-party helmet. Using its two 1080p/30fps cameras, that device continuously records views of the road both in front of and behind the rider.

Both cameras have a 143-degree field of view, allowing the rear one to see the blind spots located on either side of the motorcycle. Should the rider wish to check those spots – or to see what's directly behind them – they just activate the system's HUD unit, located inside their helmet. It responds by showing a real-time feed from the rear camera, in the lower right-hand corner of their real-world forward view.

A close-up view of the Revan camera module
A close-up view of the Revan camera module

Power is provided by two lithium-ion batteries located on the back of the helmet, which should reportedly be good for 12 hours of use per 4-hour charge.

The Bluetooth-equipped Revan communicates with both an iOS/Android app on the user's smartphone, and with a handlebar-mounted remote. Between the two of them, those peripherals allow riders to perform functions such as communicating with other Revan-using riders in their group, making/receiving phone calls, listening to music, recording/sharing geotagged helmetcam videos, and adjusting settings.

Additionally, if the user is in a hurry to check their blind spots, the rearview HUD can also be activated via simple head movements.

Should you be interested, Revan is presently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. A pledge of US$699 will get you a complete setup, when and if it reaches production. The planned retail price is $999.

Potential backers might also want to check out Argon Transform, which likewise adds a front- and rear-camera HUD system to existing helmets.

Source: Kickstarter

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1 comment
ridgetopboy
It's a great concept but a really poor execution. Considering all that bulky gear; cameras and batteries are stuck on to the exterior of your helmet, what happens if you are involved in a crash? Will your helmet still protect you with this equipment stuck on it? Will that protruding equipment stuck on your helmet cause your helmet to fail or twist your neck in such a ways as to leave you paralyzed? Not worth the risk as none of these types of devices has gone through Snell testing. This kind of equipment needs to integrated into a helmet in such a way as it does not interfere with the helmets ability to protect your head and that needs to be proven by Snell before I'd buy into it. Dress for the slide not the ride.