Motorcycles

Yamaha offers cleaner, quieter electric alternative to 50-cc scooters

Yamaha offers cleaner, quieter...
The 2022 Neo's is Yamaha's first 50-cc equivalent electric scooter to launch in Europe
The 2022 Neo's is Yamaha's first 50-cc equivalent electric scooter to launch in Europe
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The 2022 Neo's is Yamaha's first 50-cc equivalent electric scooter to launch in Europe
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The 2022 Neo's is Yamaha's first 50-cc equivalent electric scooter to launch in Europe
The 2022 Neo's electric scooter has been designed to offer riders a clean and quite city ride
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The 2022 Neo's electric scooter has been designed to offer riders a clean and quite city ride
In common with other members of the Neo's scooter family, the 2022 all-electric model has simple styling with a few playful touches to help it stand out from the crowd
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In common with other members of the Neo's scooter family, the 2022 all-electric model has simple styling with a few playful touches to help it stand out from the crowd
Two power modes are available, for top speeds of either 35 km/h or 40 km/h
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Two power modes are available, for top speeds of either 35 km/h or 40 km/h
The 2022 Neo's electric scooter's direct-drive hub motor is bolted to a rear-cast rim that's wrapped in a 130/70 low-resistance tire
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The 2022 Neo's electric scooter's direct-drive hub motor is bolted to a rear-cast rim that's wrapped in a 130/70 low-resistance tire
The 2022 Neo's electric scooter comes supplied with one removable battery unit, but is wired for a second optional battery pack for up to 68 km of per-charge range
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The 2022 Neo's electric scooter comes supplied with one removable battery unit, but is wired for a second optional battery pack for up to 68 km of per-charge range
The e-scoot features a built in comms unit for pairing with a smartphone running a companion mobile app
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The e-scoot features a built in comms unit for pairing with a smartphone running a companion mobile app
The 2022 Neo's electric scooter comes with 27 liters of underseat storage
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The 2022 Neo's electric scooter comes with 27 liters of underseat storage
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Electric scooters offer an economical, eco-friendly way for city folk to zip through the streets without having to pump away at ebike pedals, and Yamaha has just launched its first "50-cc equivalent" model for the European market – the 2022 Neo's, complete with annoying apostrophe.

The new Neo's is essentially an all-electric equivalent of the kind of 50-cc scooters that Yamaha has been producing since the 1990s, such as the BW, Aerox and the Neo's model itself. The company also has form in the electric scoot space, displaying its first model at the 1991 Tokyo Motor Show and releasing a number of electric models in Asian countries in the years since.

The Yamaha Neo's 2022 edition is its first 50-cc equivalent model to launch in the European market and is billed as an affordable zero-emissions ride, though no pricing has been revealed at this point.

It features a second generation Integrated Power Unit with a newly-developed 2.3-kW direct-drive air-cooled rear hub motor that's reported to make for a smooth and quiet ride – the company's own tests data has recorded the Neo's at some 55 dB from seven meters (23 ft) away, while the combustion engine equivalent measured some 72 dB.

The 2022 Neo's electric scooter's direct-drive hub motor is bolted to a rear-cast rim that's wrapped in a 130/70 low-resistance tire
The 2022 Neo's electric scooter's direct-drive hub motor is bolted to a rear-cast rim that's wrapped in a 130/70 low-resistance tire

There are no gears or clutch to be concerned with, riders can reportedly look forward to "plenty of torque at all throttle openings for instant performance." Two drive modes are available – a standard level delivers 2.06 kW at 40 km/h (25 mph), while an eco flavor limits power to 1.58 kW and lowers the top speed to 35 km/h (22 mph) to eke a little more ride time out of the battery.

The in-house 50.4-V/19.2-Ah Li-ion battery pack is located below the seat, and can be removed for charging indoors. It's reckoned to offer a per-charge range of around 37 km (23 miles) – or up to 38.5 km (24 miles) in eco mode based on Yamaha's in-house testing – which isn't huge but should be enough for quick trips through city streets on the way to work or for groceries.

Onboard control systems will automatically reduce power when the battery is low – with a playful turtle icon lighting up on the dash – but if an optional second battery has been connected up, then that same system will auto switch to extend the range up to 68 km (42 miles).

The e-scoot features a built in comms unit for pairing with a smartphone running a companion mobile app
The e-scoot features a built in comms unit for pairing with a smartphone running a companion mobile app

We're not really sure that this is a particularly good idea for riders in heavy city traffic, but the Neo's features a comms unit that can pair with a smartphone running a companion app and notify the rider when calls or messages are received, displaying alerts on the LCD instrument panel.

More usefully perhaps, users can access ride info such as battery status, route tracking and a parking locator via the app, and riding experiences can be shared with other users, journey information exported and tips on new places to visit can be sourced from other community members.

The Neo's wears a stripped back, clean aesthetic common to its predecessors, but with some new bodywork tweaks that give it a character of its own.

It comes in either black or white, with eye-catching aqua-colored accenting on the battery cover that the company says is destined to become a Yamaha electric vehicle signature. Rubber scuff protectors help shield the bodywork from any minor bumps encountered during the daily commutes.

Two power modes are available, for top speeds of either 35 km/h or 40 km/h
Two power modes are available, for top speeds of either 35 km/h or 40 km/h

A variety of rider heights and physiques are accommodated by a 795-mm (31.2-in) seat height and large foot space, and that seat can be popped open to store a helmet or shopping. The 13-inch, 10-spoke front wheel is wrapped in a 110/70 low-resistance tire, while the rear cast rim that's bolted to the direct-drive motor and supported by a single-sided swing arm has a chunkier 130/70 tire. And the e-scoot rocks LED "twin-eye" headlights surrounded by rings of white.

The Neo's 2.5-kW AM license class electric scooter will go on sale in Europe from May, pricing has yet to be announced.

Product page: 2022 Neo's

View gallery - 8 images
11 comments
11 comments
solas
23 miles is not nearly enough. For range on electric, take the stated range, and divide by 2 (e.g. cold weather). That's the real range.
Trylon
Only for Europe? Boo, hiss!
ppeter
From personal experience, 37 km should be enough for the big city, 68 km enough for the countryside.
But the speed is just not up to the task. For the big city You need the machine to make 70 km/h easily (not the top speed, but the speed the machine can reach easily, and keep on a road that goes moderately uphill), this would be 100+ cc or equivalent. For the country road (or if You intend to leave the big city frequently enough) You need at least 90 km/h easily, that would be the equivalent of about 200+ cc.
50cc is an emergency vehicle. You get it because a 50cc plus an old crappy car together come cheaper than a reliable car without the 50cc. The main task of a 50cc is to commute when the car is broken. The only people for whom a 50cc is the primary vehicle are those who are not old enough yet to get the driving license for 125cc or for a car.
Sciencie
Cannot ride it on the foot path cannot ride it on the road (If you like living) Probably will be twice the price of a 50cc scooter. I agree with Ppeter I borrowed a 50cc
scooter to transport my wife and I once and any slight incline you were down to working pace. Unfortunately the designers feel the need to use auto transmission with the minimum number of gears so you loose half the power driving the bloody transmission. But still far better than this electric thing.
DavidB
@solas, I don’t know where you’re getting your information, but that “divide by two” claim is nonsense.

I’ve been driving electric vehicles for nearly eight years, and cold weather knocks perhaps 25% off the started per-charge range but only in far more extreme cold than many will encounter.

In my experience, winters with daily lows around freezing bring a ten- to 20-percent drop, but summers with highs in the 90s (°F) bring ranges of around ten percent higher than the vehicle’s stated ranges.
Jinpa
The person whose hearing would be affected is the driver, who is not seven feet away. So citing a test of the dB rating should be at the driver's position. Anything else is just manipulative blather from the PR/advertising department.
Nobody
My Metro scooter does about 35 mph on a level road which is still too slow for my city streets that post 40 mph limits. Being tail gated everywhere is pretty unnerving. The small tires don't do well with potholes and rough streets. (The old mopeds with larger diameter tires were superior.) I met a couple who have two 50cc scooters to save on gas and ride together which gives the 100mpg scooters the equivalent of 50 mpg, This is about the same as my full sized motorcycle which can haul a passenger and keep up with traffic anywhere. If I want to hop over to a nearby town, forget the Metro. These electric scooters may have a place but it will be a very limited place.
solas
@DavidB I have been riding electric vehicles WITH about 23 miles of range -- for about 6 years. I stand by my statement: it's not enough, and, for the new buyer, divide by 2 is the safe rule of thumb. You only listed one of many factors of why I use this rule of thumb. If you think this range is enough with any margin, well: knock yourself out.
guzmanchinky
I'm in Europe right now and the only annoying thing (besides gas at $10 per gallon now) are the scooters. Loud and stinky.
ppeter
Halving the maximum range is realistic for everyday use in my opinion:
- the maximum number is with new batteries, most of the time You drive with "still good enough" batteries.
- You do not drive as efficient as the professional driver who did the test.
- less range in cold weather
- You want to keep a safety margin, not risk running out of power 2-3 km from home.
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