Space

NASA takes a stroll through 50 years of spacewalk history

NASA takes a stroll through 50...
Astronauts toiling away on the International Space Station
Astronauts toiling away on the International Space Station
View 69 Images
Astronauts toiling away on the International Space Station
1/69
Astronauts toiling away on the International Space Station
Astronauts with NASA's Surveyor 3 spacecraft on the moon on Nov. 20, 1969
2/69
Astronauts with NASA's Surveyor 3 spacecraft on the moon on Nov. 20, 1969
Astronaut Patrick G. Forrester works with on Materials International Space Station Experiment
3/69
Astronaut Patrick G. Forrester works with on Materials International Space Station Experiment
An astronaut performs maintenance on the International Space Station
4/69
An astronaut performs maintenance on the International Space Station
NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman take a stroll outside the International Space Station on October 7, 2014
5/69
NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman take a stroll outside the International Space Station on October 7, 2014
Apollo 14 crew members walk the moon on February 5, 1971
6/69
Apollo 14 crew members walk the moon on February 5, 1971
NASA astronaut Barry Wilmore outside the International Space Station on February 21, 2015
7/69
NASA astronaut Barry Wilmore outside the International Space Station on February 21, 2015
NASA astronaut Terry Virts outside the International Space Station as part of a mission to reconfigure it for docking by US commercial crew vehicles
8/69
NASA astronaut Terry Virts outside the International Space Station as part of a mission to reconfigure it for docking by US commercial crew vehicles
Can you spot the spacewalker?
9/69
Can you spot the spacewalker?
Astronaut Terry Virts tweeted this image on March 1, 2015 with the words, "Still thinking about that #awesome spacewalk yesterday with #AstroButch (fellow astronaut Barry "Butch" Wilmore)
10/69
Astronaut Terry Virts tweeted this image on March 1, 2015 with the words, "Still thinking about that #awesome spacewalk yesterday with #AstroButch (fellow astronaut Barry "Butch" Wilmore)
Three astronauts move the Intelsat VI satellite into the cargo bay of the Endeavour Space shuttle on May 13, 1992
11/69
Three astronauts move the Intelsat VI satellite into the cargo bay of the Endeavour Space shuttle on May 13, 1992
NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless tries out a nitrogen-propelled backpack, or Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), during the first untethered spacewalk on February 7, 1984
12/69
NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless tries out a nitrogen-propelled backpack, or Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), during the first untethered spacewalk on February 7, 1984
NASA astronaut Sunita Williams performs a spacewalk on September 5, 2012
13/69
NASA astronaut Sunita Williams performs a spacewalk on September 5, 2012
Peggy Whitson, the first female commander of the International Space Station, participates in a seven hour, ten minute spacewalk on January 30, 2008
14/69
Peggy Whitson, the first female commander of the International Space Station, participates in a seven hour, ten minute spacewalk on January 30, 2008
Astronaut Owen Garriott performs a spacewalk at the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) of the Skylab space station cluster
15/69
Astronaut Owen Garriott performs a spacewalk at the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) of the Skylab space station cluster
Astronauts inspect and replace a pump controller box on the International Space Station's far port truss (P6) leaking ammonia coolant
16/69
Astronauts inspect and replace a pump controller box on the International Space Station's far port truss (P6) leaking ammonia coolant
NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy outside the International Space Station
17/69
NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy outside the International Space Station
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin walks on the surface of the moon near the leg of the lunar module Eagle during the Apollo 11 mission
18/69
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin walks on the surface of the moon near the leg of the lunar module Eagle during the Apollo 11 mission
Astronaut James H. Newman waves from outside the International Space Station
19/69
Astronaut James H. Newman waves from outside the International Space Station
Astronauts undertake a mission to upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope in 1999
20/69
Astronauts undertake a mission to upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope in 1999
A spacewalking astronaut on a mission to change a faulty water pump on the International Space Station
21/69
A spacewalking astronaut on a mission to change a faulty water pump on the International Space Station
A spacewalking astronaut on a mission to change a faulty water pump on the International Space Station
22/69
A spacewalking astronaut on a mission to change a faulty water pump on the International Space Station
Spacewalking astronauts on a mission to change a faulty water pump on the International Space Station
23/69
Spacewalking astronauts on a mission to change a faulty water pump on the International Space Station
Astronauts servicing the Hubble Space Telescope
24/69
Astronauts servicing the Hubble Space Telescope
Astronaut John W. Young jumps for joy during the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission
25/69
Astronaut John W. Young jumps for joy during the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission
Astronauts Story Musgrave, left, and Don Peterson float in the cargo bay of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger on April 7, 1983
26/69
Astronauts Story Musgrave, left, and Don Peterson float in the cargo bay of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger on April 7, 1983
Astronaut Andrew Feustel reenters the space station after completing n 8-hour, 7-minute spacewalk on May 22, 2011
27/69
Astronaut Andrew Feustel reenters the space station after completing n 8-hour, 7-minute spacewalk on May 22, 2011
A NASA astronaut works on the International Space Station
28/69
A NASA astronaut works on the International Space Station
A fish-eye lens attached to an electronic still camera was used to capture this image of NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff during this spacewalk
29/69
A fish-eye lens attached to an electronic still camera was used to capture this image of NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff during this spacewalk
Astronaut Bruce McCandless II, STS 41-B mission specialist, participates in a historical spacewalk, the first use of a nitrogen-propelled, hand-controlled device called the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU)
30/69
Astronaut Bruce McCandless II, STS 41-B mission specialist, participates in a historical spacewalk, the first use of a nitrogen-propelled, hand-controlled device called the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU)
Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Lunar Module pilot, pauses near a tool carrier during the Apollo 12 spacewalk on the moon's surface
31/69
Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Lunar Module pilot, pauses near a tool carrier during the Apollo 12 spacewalk on the moon's surface
On Feb. 12, 1984, astronaut Bruce McCandless, ventured further away from the confines and safety of his ship than any previous astronaut had ever been. This was made possible by a nitrogen jet propelled backpack
32/69
On Feb. 12, 1984, astronaut Bruce McCandless, ventured further away from the confines and safety of his ship than any previous astronaut had ever been. This was made possible by a nitrogen jet propelled backpack
Astronaut Mark Lee tests the new backpack called Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER), a system designed for use in the event a crew member becomes untethered while conducting an EVA
33/69
Astronaut Mark Lee tests the new backpack called Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER), a system designed for use in the event a crew member becomes untethered while conducting an EVA
Alan L. Bean descends onto the lunar surface during the Apollo 12 mission
34/69
Alan L. Bean descends onto the lunar surface during the Apollo 12 mission
Astronauts John Grunsfeld (left) and Andew Feustel with the Hubble Space telescope
35/69
Astronauts John Grunsfeld (left) and Andew Feustel with the Hubble Space telescope
Astronauts Michael Good (left) and Mike Massimino work to refurbish and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope
36/69
Astronauts Michael Good (left) and Mike Massimino work to refurbish and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope
Astronaut Christopher Cassidy performs maintenance on the International Space Station
37/69
Astronaut Christopher Cassidy performs maintenance on the International Space Station
Astronaut Nicole Stott performs maintenance on the International Space Station
38/69
Astronaut Nicole Stott performs maintenance on the International Space Station
Astronauts Danny Olivas and Nicole Stott perform maintenance on the International Space Station
39/69
Astronauts Danny Olivas and Nicole Stott perform maintenance on the International Space Station
Astronaut Ed White partaking in the first American spacewalk on June 3, 1965
40/69
Astronaut Ed White partaking in the first American spacewalk on June 3, 1965
Astronaut Nicholas Patrick performs construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station
41/69
Astronaut Nicholas Patrick performs construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station
Astronaut F. Story Musgrave prepares to be elevated to the top of the towering Hubble Space Telescope
42/69
Astronaut F. Story Musgrave prepares to be elevated to the top of the towering Hubble Space Telescope
During this spacewalk, astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Clayton Anderson removed a depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the truss of the International Space Station
43/69
During this spacewalk, astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Clayton Anderson removed a depleted ammonia tank and installed a 1,700-pound ammonia tank on the truss of the International Space Station
Astronaut Rick Mastracchio on a maintenance mission at the International Space Station
44/69
Astronaut Rick Mastracchio on a maintenance mission at the International Space Station
Astronaut Steven L. Smith during a Hubble servicing mission in 1999
45/69
Astronaut Steven L. Smith during a Hubble servicing mission in 1999
Apollo 17 command module pilot Ronald E. Evans, Jr. in space
46/69
Apollo 17 command module pilot Ronald E. Evans, Jr. in space
Astronaut Dale A. Gardner with the Manned Maneuvering Unit
47/69
Astronaut Dale A. Gardner with the Manned Maneuvering Unit
Astronaut Mark C. Lee floats freely as he tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system, intended to be used to emergencies only
48/69
Astronaut Mark C. Lee floats freely as he tests the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system, intended to be used to emergencies only
Astronaut Kathryn C. Thornton services the Hubble Space Telescope
49/69
Astronaut Kathryn C. Thornton services the Hubble Space Telescope
Astronauts cleaning the International Space Station's starboard solar alpha rotary joint (SARJ)
50/69
Astronauts cleaning the International Space Station's starboard solar alpha rotary joint (SARJ)
Astronauts cleaning the International Space Station's starboard solar alpha rotary joint (SARJ)
51/69
Astronauts cleaning the International Space Station's starboard solar alpha rotary joint (SARJ)
Astronauts cleaning the International Space Station's starboard solar alpha rotary joint (SARJ)
52/69
Astronauts cleaning the International Space Station's starboard solar alpha rotary joint (SARJ)
Astronauts remove debris and apply lubrication around the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ)
53/69
Astronauts remove debris and apply lubrication around the starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ)
Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt on the moon with Earth in the background
54/69
Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt on the moon with Earth in the background
This image of David Scott in the open hatch of the command module was taken during the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission
55/69
This image of David Scott in the open hatch of the command module was taken during the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission
Astronaut John Grunsfeld performs work on the Hubble Space Telescope
56/69
Astronaut John Grunsfeld performs work on the Hubble Space Telescope
Astronaut Andrew Feustel performs maintenance on the Hubble Space Telescope
57/69
Astronaut Andrew Feustel performs maintenance on the Hubble Space Telescope
Astronauts outside the International Space Station
58/69
Astronauts outside the International Space Station
On June 3, 1965, Edward H. White II became the first American to step outside his spacecraft and let go
59/69
On June 3, 1965, Edward H. White II became the first American to step outside his spacecraft and let go
Astronauts outside the International Space Station
60/69
Astronauts outside the International Space Station
Astronauts carry out construction work on the International Space Station
61/69
Astronauts carry out construction work on the International Space Station
European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang during construction work on the International Space Station
62/69
European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Christer Fuglesang during construction work on the International Space Station
Astronaut Carlos I. Noriega waves at his spacewalking partner, astronaut Joseph R Tanner
63/69
Astronaut Carlos I. Noriega waves at his spacewalking partner, astronaut Joseph R Tanner
Astronaut Piers J. Sellers anchored to the Space Shuttle Discovery's Remote Manipulator System/Orbiter Boom Sensor System foot restraint with a cloudy Earth in the background
64/69
Astronaut Piers J. Sellers anchored to the Space Shuttle Discovery's Remote Manipulator System/Orbiter Boom Sensor System foot restraint with a cloudy Earth in the background
Astronaut Jim Reilly performs construction work on the International Space Station
65/69
Astronaut Jim Reilly performs construction work on the International Space Station
Astronaut Rick Mastracchio at work on the International Space Station on August 15, 2007
66/69
Astronaut Rick Mastracchio at work on the International Space Station on August 15, 2007
An astronaut carries out construction work on the International Space Station
67/69
An astronaut carries out construction work on the International Space Station
Astronaut Scott Parazynski assesses his repair work over the International Space Station's solar array on November 3, 2007
68/69
Astronaut Scott Parazynski assesses his repair work over the International Space Station's solar array on November 3, 2007
Astronaut Michael Gernhardt attached to the Shuttle Endeavour's robot arm with Earth in the background
69/69
Astronaut Michael Gernhardt attached to the Shuttle Endeavour's robot arm with Earth in the background
View gallery - 69 images

NASA has marked half a century of spacewalks by rolling out a catalog of breathtaking photos taken across decades of extravehicular activity. June 3 marks 50 years to the day that Edward H. White II stepped out into the emptiness of space in 1965, blazing a trail for generations of NASA astronauts to follow.

White ventured out into space from NASA's Gemini IV spacecraft, but he wasn't the first human to step outside a spacecraft in orbit. Only months earlier, on March 18, 1965, Russian cosmonaut Alexei Leonov took the first space walk, pipping the Americans and their exploratory aspirations at the post.

Almost two decades after White spent 20 minutes making his way around the outside of the Gemini spacecraft, countryman Bruce McCandless made another huge leap.

On Feb. 12, 1984, astronaut Bruce McCandless, ventured further away from the confines and safety of his ship than any previous astronaut had ever been. This was made possible by a nitrogen jet propelled backpack
On Feb. 12, 1984, astronaut Bruce McCandless, ventured further away from the confines and safety of his ship than any previous astronaut had ever been. This was made possible by a nitrogen jet propelled backpack

As part of the STS-41B mission aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger, McCandless would depart the spacecraft to perform the first untethered spacewalk. This was made possible by way of a nitrogen-propelled, hand-controlled jetpack known as the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), which allowed McCandless to move around in open space.

NASA astronauts have now completed hundreds of spacewalks. This includes 21 spacewalks on the surface of the Moon, 184 strolls outside the International Space Station, 82 walks outside of space shuttle airlocks and 166 hours logged servicing the Hubble Space Telescope.

These days, NASA is turning its attention to developing more advanced spacesuits that can handle travel into deep space, namely a trip to Mars.

You can see some of the many highlights of NASA's 50 year history of spacewalking in the spectacular photo gallery.

Source: NASA

View gallery - 69 images
2 comments
viffer
It's kewl to see New Zealand in the background of photos 1 and 61. :D
Lawrence Klein
As Canadian astronaut Dave Williams wraps up his STS-118 shuttle mission repairing & constructing the International Space Station, years of training and technology developed in Montreal have helped him soar to great heights.
For decades, NASA has been studying astronaut’s physiological responses to zero gravity, to living in outer space and to staying in a space vehicles and space stations for extended periods of time. NASA recently conducted under water research since the environment provides some useful similarities to working in space. Using off the shelf technology, developed by THOUGHT TECHNOLOGY LTD of Montreal. The device is a wearable outfit that records multiple physiological measurements simultaneously. The technology is ultra miniaturized, using a standard FlexComp Infiniti™ physiological encoder, storing the data using flash memory cards. The astronauts, Commander Dave Williams, a Canadian Physician, and Ron Garin, an American, wore the “gear” throughout the day while living in an NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) undersea habitat, off the shore of Key Largo Florida, 65 feet down, below the surface.NASA researcher William Toscano described the mission, “Our project was called Nemo Nine. It was 22 days long, with 2 astronauts participating. They wore the FlexComp Infiniti™ system for three of the mission days. What we were looking was the effect of isolation, workload and fatigue on the individuals. We’re using the Nemo Nine environment as an analog of a space station.”
It was all stored on flash memory cards, “We recorded five measurements–heart rate and electrocardiogram, respiration, skin conductance, hand temperature and finger pulse volume. Throughout the day they had activities and tasks to do.” New, micro-miniaturization technologies have enabled NASA researchers to use commercially produced biomedical devices like the FlexComp Infiniti™ to do what used to take a wall full of equipment easily weighing over 1000 pounds. Now, the device, manufactured by Thought Technology a company that is the world’s largest provider of medical and consumer biofeedback instrumentation, weighs less than a pound and has built-in data storage using flash memory cards. http://www.thoughttechnology.com/blog/wp/?works=what-helps-give-canadas-dave-williams-a-steady-hand-in-space