Outdoors

Leatherman goes back to basics with heritage-inspired Bond multitool

Leatherman goes back to basics...
The Leatherman Bond is inspired by the company's original PST multitool from 1983
The Leatherman Bond is inspired by the company's original PST multitool from 1983
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The Leatherman Bond in action as a box cutter
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The Leatherman Bond in action as a box cutter
The Leatherman Bond features 14 tools in all
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The Leatherman Bond features 14 tools in all
The Leatherman Bond is inspired by the company's original PST multitool from 1983
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The Leatherman Bond is inspired by the company's original PST multitool from 1983
The Leatherman Bond carries 14 tools in all
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The Leatherman Bond carries 14 tools in all
The Leatherman Bond is priced at $50
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The Leatherman Bond is priced at $50
The Leatherman Bond is available now
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The Leatherman Bond is available now
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Leatherman's mutltiools have taken all shapes and sizes in its 38-year existence, but in designing its latest creation the company is returning to its roots. The newly launched Leatherman Bond is based on its first ever model launched in 1983, offering the same 14-tool functionality in a rather lightweight and budget-friendly package.

The original PST was launched in 1983 as an innovative plier-based multitiool developed by company founder Tim Leatherman, with the design providing the backbone for many of the company's multitools since.

Lately, we've seen the company branch out with more creative designs that include folding knives, ratchet driver attachments and magnetic multitools that can be opened and closed with one hand. It has also launched tools with medical shears for medics, pocket tools for skaters and surfers and even multitool bracelets that can be worn around the wrist.

The Leatherman Bond carries 14 tools in all
The Leatherman Bond carries 14 tools in all

This time around, Leatherman is getting back to basics. The Bond features largely the same minimalist functionality as 1983's PST, with needlenose pliers spearheading a suite of tried-and-tested tools, including wire cutters and strippers, Philips and flathead screwdrivers, a ruler, wood and metal file, a can opener and, of course, a 2.9-in (7.36-cm) stainless steel blade.

The Leatherman Bond in action as a box cutter
The Leatherman Bond in action as a box cutter

All of this comes in a package weighing just 5.8 oz (164 g), which is more than an ounce lighter than Leatherman's other 14-tool multitools, the Wingman and Sidekick, both of which are priced a littler higher at US$60, too. The Bond also features contoured handles for a comfy grip, and attachment points for a lanyard and pocket clip, which is sold separately.

Leatherman has offered limited edition versions of its classic PST multitool over the journey, though one of these will currently set you back $395. Priced at $50, the Bond might present as a much more palatable option.

Source: Leatherman

View gallery - 6 images
5 comments
5 comments
wolf0579
FEMA recommends every family have a multi-tool in their emergency Emergency/"Bug-Out" kit.
Regrarians Ltd.
Thanks for the article. On the topic of bringing old 'leathermen' back, my daily is the retired 'Flair®' — I keep buying them on eBay and all of our kids have one too. Its surprising how often the oyster fork and pâte knife get used :)
TpPa
Does the Bond have the lock open feature of modern days? I have the original (ya I'm old) and it has been retired for many years even though I like everything about it, except things don't lock open, not only a hazard with a blade, but a pain when you have to push down hard to break a screw loose because it always folds shut.
ljaques
Awesome. It's a little larger than my Leatherman. But they got it right. Needle nosed dykes are the mainstay, with blade, screwdrivers, and file absolute necessities. Got a mini clone from Chiwan and tried to break it but couldn't. It's in my EDC pouch. But what I really like, more than anything else, is that THERE IS NO BOTTLE OPENER on this Leatherman tool.
wolf0579
WTF is 'PST' ??? I've always seen them referred to as "multi-tools". Is this some kind of new rewriting of the lexicon?