Physics

Strange metals: New state of matter shares properties with black holes

Strange metals: New state of m...
Physicists have found that "strange metals" constitute a new state of matter
Physicists have found that "strange metals" constitute a new state of matter
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A diagram showing where the new state of matter, strange metals, fits in amongst other known states
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A diagram showing where the new state of matter, strange metals, fits in amongst other known states
Physicists have found that "strange metals" constitute a new state of matter
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Physicists have found that "strange metals" constitute a new state of matter

“Strange metals” have that name for a reason – these materials exhibit some unusual conductive properties and surprisingly, even have things in common with black holes. Now, a new study has characterized them in more detail, and found that strange metals constitute a new state of matter.

So-called strange metals differ from regular metals because their electrical resistance is directly linked to temperature. Electrons in strange metals are seen to lose their energy as fast as the laws of quantum mechanics allow. But that’s not all – their conductivity is also linked to two fundamental constants of physics: Planck’s constant, which defines how much energy a photon can carry, and Boltzmann’s constant, which relates the kinetic energy of particles in a gas with the temperature of that gas.

While these properties have been well observed over the years, scientists have had a hard time accurately modeling strange metals. So in a new study, researchers from the Flatiron Institute and Cornell University set out to solve the model, right down to absolute zero – lower than the lowest possible temperature for materials.

In doing so, the team discovered that strange metals actually represent a new state of matter. It turns out they exist between two known phases of matter – Mott insulating spin glasses and Fermi liquids – and the researchers were able to describe their properties in more detail.

A diagram showing where the new state of matter, strange metals, fits in amongst other known states
A diagram showing where the new state of matter, strange metals, fits in amongst other known states

“This quantum spin liquid state is not so locked down, but it’s also not completely free,” says Eun-Ah Kim, an author of the study. “It is a sluggish, soupy, slushy state. It is metallic but reluctantly metallic, and it’s pushing the degree of chaos to the limit of quantum mechanics.”

But perhaps the weirdest, most striking thing about strange metals is that they share some properties with black holes. These cosmic oddities also have properties that are tied exclusively to temperature and the Planck and Boltzmann constants, including the amount of time they “ring” after merging with other black holes.

Normally, the physics of the electrons in strange metals are far too complex for accurate calculations. There’s a huge amount of particles involved, and because electrons tend to form quantum entanglements, they can’t be treated as separate objects.

The team overcame these hurdles using two different methods. First, they used a quantum embedding method to perform complex calculations on only a few atoms, then generalize for the rest of the system. Next, they used a quantum Monte Carlo algorithm, which uses repeated random sampling to perform calculations. Together, this combination helped the team gain a better understanding of strange metals.

The team says their new model of strange metals could help physicists understand how superconductors may work at higher temperatures.

The research was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Source: Simons Foundation

5 comments
drBill
T/t vs t/U is worth a note or two to identify the units. The graph seems like a phase diagram, but usually P v T. Having to read the original article defeats the purpose of a broad-audience article imo. [Minor note about "There’s a huge amount of particles involved..." should be "NUMBER" not "AMOUNT"]
Some context would have helped me.... are "strange" metals known as metals except for the unusual situation that sometimes occurs, or are they simply strange conditions of ordinarily non-metals, under which they exhibit metallic properties?
Expanded Viewpoint
And just where on the Periodic Table of the Elements do we find these "strange" metals? Or are they alloys made up of those elements? Which elements and in what quantities are we talking about here? Are there any special processes used to form these alloys, if they are alloys? And I don't see any citations of where or how any of the measurements that are needed for doing calculations were done. To extrapolate from only a few measurements out to a general theorem is pretty shoddy science to say the least!! Errors don't just creep in by doing that, they can come flooding in! Experiments and measurements have to be able to be repeated, before any data they give us can be considered to be valid and meaningful.

Randy
guzmanchinky
I'm pretty smart. But when I read an article like this I realize that my two Bachelor degrees in science barely scratch the surface of what we now know, and how much more there is to discover...
Gabor Revesz
funny story — i recently took a spin glass to fermi liquid ass up into a strange metal.
christopher
They SO missed a perfect opportunity to name something new ... "strange metals" is so dumb, it boggles the mind that anyone working on this stuff could actually even be a scientist in the first place. In years to come, they won't be "strange" anymore, so what could have been "black metals" or "Kim Metals" or something else awesome of their own choosing, will forevermore merely highlight the stupidity and lack of foresight of the researchers that discovered it.