3D Printing

Fathom cooks up 3D-printed smart oven

Fathom cooks up 3D-printed sma...
Fathom plans to open source the designs for its thermal chambers
Fathom plans to open source the designs for its thermal chambers
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Made from 3D-printed, engineering-grade plastics, the Pyra uses a fan in its base to circulate air over heating elements and through an intricate system of air ducts, achieving temperatures of up to 375° F (190° C)
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Made from 3D-printed, engineering-grade plastics, the Pyra uses a fan in its base to circulate air over heating elements and through an intricate system of air ducts, achieving temperatures of up to 375° F (190° C)
Fathom plans to open source the designs for its thermal chambers
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Fathom plans to open source the designs for its thermal chambers
Fathom has plans to make its thermal chamber designs open source, allowing others to 3D print their own device
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Fathom has plans to make its thermal chamber designs open source, allowing others to 3D print their own device
Once the device was assembled and the non-3D-printed electric components installed, the team demonstrated its effectiveness by slow cooking a dry-rubbed cut of beef
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Once the device was assembled and the non-3D-printed electric components installed, the team demonstrated its effectiveness by slow cooking a dry-rubbed cut of beef
The team fabricated the smart oven using a Fortus 900mc printer, which is currently the only system capable of printing using a food-safe material known as ULTEM 1010
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The team fabricated the smart oven using a Fortus 900mc printer, which is currently the only system capable of printing using a food-safe material known as ULTEM 1010
Project Pyra is actually an evolution of Fathom's earlier Aquino Thermal Chamber device, which was designed to incubate cell cultures
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Project Pyra is actually an evolution of Fathom's earlier Aquino Thermal Chamber device, which was designed to incubate cell cultures
View gallery - 6 images

From jet engines to office buildings, we've seen all manner of things constructed using 3D-printing techniques, but we're yet to see it used to make something that can cook us a hot meal. Until now that is. The Pyra, by Oakland-based company Fathom, is the first 3D-printed smart oven.

Despitetaking its name (at least in part) from “pyro” – the Greek wordfor fire – the Pyra smart oven is entirely flameless. Made from3D-printed, engineering-grade plastics, the device uses a fan in itsbase to circulate air over heating elements and through an intricatesystem of air ducts, achieving temperatures of up to 375° F(190° C).

Theteam fabricated the plastic components for the smart oven using a Fortus 900mc printer, which iscurrently the only system capable of printing using a food-safematerial known as ULTEM 1010. Once the Pyra was assembled and the non-3D-printed electric components installed, the teamdemonstrated its effectiveness by slow cooking a dry-rubbed cut ofbeef. The results look suitably delicious.

Once the device was assembled and the non-3D-printed electric components installed, the team demonstrated its effectiveness by slow cooking a dry-rubbed cut of beef
Once the device was assembled and the non-3D-printed electric components installed, the team demonstrated its effectiveness by slow cooking a dry-rubbed cut of beef

ThePyra is connected to the cloud via built-in Wi-Fi and can be controlled via an HTML5 webapp.There are no physical buttons on the appliance itself and the app isfully customizable, allowing users to adjust control options to suittheir own specific needs.

The device is actually an evolution of Fathom's earlier Aquino ThermalChamber device (pictured below), which was designed to incubate cell cultures. Thecompany has plans to make its thermal chamber designs open source,allowing others to 3D print their own device, whether they're usingit for scientific purposes, cooking, or whatever else they can dreamup.

Project Pyra is actually an evolution of Fathom's earlier Aquino Thermal Chamber device, which was designed to incubate cell cultures
Project Pyra is actually an evolution of Fathom's earlier Aquino Thermal Chamber device, which was designed to incubate cell cultures

Overall,the team hopes that the project will encourage both individuals andcompanies to push the boundaries of what's possible with 3D printing.

"Ihope this design inspires designers and engineers to challenge theway they think about product design and manufacturing," saidFathom's director of research, and Pyra's creator, Carlo Quiñonez.

Formore on the Pyra smart oven, you can check out the video below.

Source:Fathom

Trailer: Project Pyra, First 3D Printed Smart Oven

View gallery - 6 images
3 comments
Tom Lee Mullins
I think that is unique. It would be interesting to give it a try.
jerryd
An alum sheet version would work as well.
dsiple
What a shame to cook that piece of meat to well-done.