Robotics

Cobi robot autonomously performs needle-less vaccinations

Cobi robot autonomously perfor...
Along with its obvious use for administering the COVID-19 vaccine, the Cobi robot could also be utilized for other types of vaccinations
Along with its obvious use for administering the COVID-19 vaccine, the Cobi robot could also be utilized for other types of vaccinations
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It will be approximately two years before the Cobi robot is in general use
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It will be approximately two years before the Cobi robot is in general use
Along with its obvious use for administering the COVID-19 vaccine, the Cobi robot could also be utilized for other types of vaccinations
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Along with its obvious use for administering the COVID-19 vaccine, the Cobi robot could also be utilized for other types of vaccinations

It goes without saying that a lot of people are receiving the COVID-19 vaccine these days, and will continue to do so for some time. A new robot is designed to help streamline the process, by autonomously – and needle-lessly – vaccinating human patients.

Known as Cobi, the device was developed by Canadian startup Cobionix, a University of Waterloo spinoff company. It's claimed to be the first robot to ever successfully perform an intramuscular injection, and it did so without using a hypodermic needle.

The idea is that after pre-registering for a vaccination online, patients will show up at a clinic or other location that's utilizing a Cobi robot, then display a piece of identification to a camera on the unit's touchscreen interface. As they arrive, multiple 3D depth sensors detect their presence.

Once their ID has been verified, the Cobi robotic arm retrieves a vial of vaccine from a built-in storage area. A LiDAR sensor on the "hand" of that arm is then used to create a 3D digital map of the patient's body, which is analyzed via AI-based software to determine the optimal injection site.

It will be approximately two years before the Cobi robot is in general use
It will be approximately two years before the Cobi robot is in general use

Utilizing a third-party needle-less technology, the vaccine itself is subsequently injected in the form of a high-pressure jet of fluid that passes through a human-hair-width orifice. The company is unable to provide more details at this time.

Cobionix co-founder Tim Lasswell tells us that it will be about two years before Cobi enters the healthcare market. Once that time comes, it is hoped that the robot will allow more people to be vaccinated at once, while also lowering healthcare costs – it could additionally be utilized in remote locations which lack trained clinicians.

For now, though, you can see a demo of the Cobi robot in the video below.

World's First Autonomous Robotic Injection

Source: University of Waterloo

7 comments
7 comments
TomLeeM
I think it could work for not just the covid-19 vaccine but all vaccines that are available out there. I think it would make it easier to get them.
christopher
Needle or not, the question remains: does it *HURT* ?
MQ
Hell no. ??.. Is this using a jet innoculator.. splashback aerosolisation etc. made these get phased out around the the date time of the 3rd Bond film...

Need to prove as good as zero risk of cross contamination, as well as proving the dose ALL goes IM.

The pain of the needle is the worst reason to explain hesitancy... Psychology and bad experiences are better explanations. . Train people to administer properly.
Aross
I remember seeing this type of injection in a film about the US military decades ago. As MQ stated it was rife with problems so discontinued.
michael_dowling
I think this is the same tech as used by Bones on Star Trek.
c w
Time allows for advancement, so a process that didn't work before could workout now.

THAT said...

I'm going to need to know exactly what being done to my person before I allow it to be done. 'Third party needleless technology' will not suffice por moi.
IdahoHacker
While it wasn't robotic or autonomous, everyone who went through Basic Training in the early '70s got needleless injections for all of our vaccines using a similar high-pressure liquid injection system. 50 years ago, literally. Worked great, minimal pain. The only risk was this: because the high-pressure jet of vaccine was being "injected" through the skin, it took a few milliseconds for the injection to be complete. If you moved at all, the jet of liquid would create a slice in your skin. I saw many guys with blood running down their arms and dripping from their fingertips.

That's why the medic looked you right in the eye and said: "DON'T MOVE!"