Electronics

Rocketbook digitizes your notes, just microwave it to start over

Rocketbook digitizes your note...
The Rocketbook's contents can be erased by placing it in the microwave for 30 seconds
The Rocketbook's contents can be erased by placing it in the microwave for 30 seconds
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The Rocketbook's contents can be erased by placing it in the microwave for 30 seconds
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The Rocketbook's contents can be erased by placing it in the microwave for 30 seconds
At the bottom of each page is a set of seven icons, what the team calls magic buttons
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At the bottom of each page is a set of seven icons, what the team calls magic buttons
In addition to shooting handwritten notes and doodles to the cloud, when it fills up users can stick the book in the microwave to wipe its pages clean
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In addition to shooting handwritten notes and doodles to the cloud, when it fills up users can stick the book in the microwave to wipe its pages clean

With touchscreens and keyboards never far from our fingertips these days, paper notebooks might not be as essential as they once were. But there's still something pleasant, if not always convenient, about putting pen to paper. The latest book to join a growing library of digitally inspired writing platforms is Rocketbook, and it does so with an interesting twist. In addition to shooting handwritten notes and doodles to the cloud, when it fills up users can stick the book in the microwave to wipe its pages clean.

Recent devices that serve a similar purpose to the Rocketbook include the Livescribe notebook from stationary stalwart Moleskine, along with the Equil Smartmarker and Smart Kapp, which are both designed to digitize and share content written on whiteboards.

Joe Lemay, the Rocketbook's creator, is looking to hit that sweet spot between technologies new and practical and old and cherished, with a cleverly designed A4, 8.5 x 11 in (210 x 297 mm) notebook. And if the crowdfunding campaign he is running is anything to go by, he is pretty well on target, having amassed almost US$300,000 in pledges at the time of writing, dwarfing his original goal of $20,000.

At the bottom of each of the Rocketbook's pages is a set of seven icons, what the company calls magic buttons. Each button can be assigned to a location in the cloud, meaning that all your scribbles on that particular page will be sent directly to wherever you'd like them to go. Need those lecture notes compiled neatly in your university Evernote folder? Or perhaps that inspired series of illustrations sent to Dropbox? Then just mark the relevant magic button.

The digitization process works a little differently from the products mentioned above. While the Moleskin Livescribe notebook relies on a special dotted pattern to digitally track the pen's movements in real-time, Rocketbook does so after the fact. When you are finished writing, you fire up the Rocketbook smartphone app (iOS and Android) and hold it above each double page spread. The app then scans and processes each page and directs them to their locations as indicated by the magic buttons.

Though you can write in the Rocketbook with any old pen, wielding Pilot's FriXion pens brings on another level of functionality. The ink inside these pens responds to heat by turning invisible, and because the Rocketbook is designed to be microwave-safe, nuking it for 30 seconds will erase all of its contents.

Over at Lemay's Indiegogo page, a pledge of $25 will put you in line for a 50-sheet Rocketbook and a single black Pilot FriXion pen. If all goes to plan, he hopes to start shipping his microwaveable notebooks in July 2015.

You can check out the Rocketbook pitch video below.

Source: Indiegogo

Rocketbook

3 comments
Njall
The page with symbols which can be detected by software is a cool idea. The function of the software is useful. However, I have a problem with the pen. While microwave erasable ink is a really neat idea, the ink is not removed, it is only rendered invisible. The ink disappears when heated to 140 deg F. At 14 deg F the ink will reappear. I got this info from a description of the pen on an office supply website. Accidentally leave your notebook in you car on a cold day and all the past writing will reappear. Accidentally leave your notebook in your car on a hot day and everything not already recorded will be lost. The ink can be made invisible or visible again; however, if you did not save your work beforehand it will be all lost. Regardless, at some point the notebook will become unusable. While it will save some waste, paper is recyclable. I do it all the time. Why not simply have a PDF of the page and let the user print their own? The only thing of value in the concept is actually the software to read the pictures and store the pages onto this or that location. And I've yet to be sold on the use of the symbols. I personally have a lot of ideas to save and eight symbols are too few. The idea of pen to computer file is REALLY neat. It needs some work however.
도영 고
Still paper? Goog. Still.....it will be some valuable.
Gregg Eshelman
Scan one page, print off as many as you want for use with the app. Goodbye continuing revenue stream. Rocketbook? Name already used by the NuvoMedia Rocketbook back in 1998.