Tiny Houses

Futuristic Nestron Cube modular smart home gets panoramic

Futuristic Nestron Cube modula...
Along with more space, the Nestron Cube Two X offers more glass than the Cube Two with a floor-to-ceiling window and long window flanking the entry
Along with more space, the Nestron Cube Two X offers more glass than the Cube Two with a floor-to-ceiling window and long window flanking the entry
View 14 Images
The C2X debuts as Nestron's largest Cube model, adding 30 percent more space than the Cube 2
1/14
The C2X debuts as Nestron's largest Cube model, adding 30 percent more space than the Cube 2
Nestron Cube Two X rear
2/14
Nestron Cube Two X rear
Along with more space, the Nestron Cube Two X offers more glass than the Cube Two with a floor-to-ceiling window and long window flanking the entry
3/14
Along with more space, the Nestron Cube Two X offers more glass than the Cube Two with a floor-to-ceiling window and long window flanking the entry
The Cube Two frame pictured shows Nestron's galvanized steel structure that lies below the FRP exterior
4/14
The Cube Two frame pictured shows Nestron's galvanized steel structure that lies below the FRP exterior
Inside the single-bedroom C2X, the bar-height dining table separates the kitchen and living area
5/14
Inside the single-bedroom C2X, the bar-height dining table separates the kitchen and living area
The kitchen of the single-bedroom model has space for a double-door fridge and under-counter washing machine
6/14
The kitchen of the single-bedroom model has space for a double-door fridge and under-counter washing machine
The curvy skylight/window adds to the sweeping views of the C2X model
7/14
The curvy skylight/window adds to the sweeping views of the C2X model
Buyers can select one- or two-bedroom Cube Two X models
8/14
Buyers can select one- or two-bedroom Cube Two X models
The smaller kitchen of the two-bedroom C2X
9/14
The smaller kitchen of the two-bedroom C2X
Enjoying the view
10/14
Enjoying the view
The more compact kitchen in the two-bedroom can house an optional single-door fridge, while the available washing machine finds its home in the bathroom
11/14
The more compact kitchen in the two-bedroom can house an optional single-door fridge, while the available washing machine finds its home in the bathroom
The two-bedroom model has its living room on the opposite side of the kitchen
12/14
The two-bedroom model has its living room on the opposite side of the kitchen
Singapore's Nestron launches its latest futuristic modular smart home
13/14
Singapore's Nestron launches its latest futuristic modular smart home
The C2X packs more window glass and a larger two-door entryway than the C2
14/14
The C2X packs more window glass and a larger two-door entryway than the C2
View gallery - 14 images

Straight out of the smart, sustainable suburbs of an extraterrestrial future, the Nestron Cube Two X is a step toward the next generation of modular living. Compared to other Nestron Cubes, it has extra space and big-time views (of Earth, Mars or elsewhere) out of large windows and skylights. All this ultramodern tiny home needs to support smart yet simple living is a scenic slice of alpine, coastal, rural, or cosmic land.

Nestron's Cube series has come a long way since we first looked at the single-room C1 shelter pod back in January 2020. Not everyone is ready to go all in on a studio-style tiny abode of a mere 156 square feet (14.5 sq m), so the Cube family has since grown to include the $59,000+ three-/four-person Cube Two and now the Cube Two X (C2X), which adds 30 percent more living space over the Two for a 377-square foot (35-sq m) floor plan.

Singapore-headquartered Nestron stretches the C2X an extra 4.3 feet (1.3 m) over the Two, giving it a 32.8-foot (10-m) width. The height remains steady at 10.2 feet (3.1 m), while the depth expands by 4 inches (10 cm) to 11.5 feet (3.5 m). The added width is noticeable immediately and supports the combination of floor-to-ceiling window, double front doors and long, landscape-style picture window. The wider doorway makes it easier to move large items in and out.

The C2X packs more window glass and a larger two-door entryway than the C2
The C2X packs more window glass and a larger two-door entryway than the C2

What a Nestron prefab mini-home lacks in outright residential size, it makes up for in smart-home convenience. Nestron equips the C2X standard with digital locks, electric blinds, motion-sensing lights and a digital music player, offering many more smart features by way of its options sheet. Examples of optional add-ons include smart mirrors, wall-mounted tablets, smart kitchen appliances, a smart toilet, automatic sliding doors, and even smart furniture and structural elements. Occupants can use the smart amenities on their own or integrate them together via a platform like Google Home or Amazon Alexa. Nestron is also working on its own "Canny" AI system to deliver a more complete, integrated smart home experience that benefits Cube dwellers from wake-up alarm to bedtime.

The lack of a house foundation for the C2X is certainly something to be wary of if you live in an area prone to natural disaster, but Nestron says it developed the insulated, galvanized steel-framed structure with earthquakes, hurricanes and typhoons in mind. It also offers customized fortification solutions for customers who want or require something more.

The Cube Two frame pictured shows Nestron's galvanized steel structure that lies below the FRP exterior
The Cube Two frame pictured shows Nestron's galvanized steel structure that lies below the FRP exterior

As far as its eco-friendly claims, Nestron explains that 90 percent of the materials used to build its homes are recyclable at the end of a Cube's lifecycle. And with a 50-year structural warranty, Nestron does not intend for Cubes to hit the recycling plant in the near term.

To further encourage sustainable living, Nestron offers off-grid solutions like solar/battery electrical systems and composting toilets. The Cube homes can also be hooked up to the local sewer, water, gas and/or electrical infrastructure according to building regulations.

Nestron offers the Cube Two X in one- and two-bedroom floor plans, each with the bedroom(s), an eat-in-style kitchen with sink and small dining area, a dry bathroom with shower, toilet, sink and water heater, a living room with sofa, and an entryway. Storage cabinets, closets and shelves feature throughout. Available options include in-floor heating, an induction cooktop, a single- or double-door fridge, a projection entertainment system and a washing machine. A mechanical/electrical closet organizes functional equipment and components in a single out-of-the-way location at the rear of the home.

The kitchen of the single-bedroom model has space for a double-door fridge and under-counter washing machine
The kitchen of the single-bedroom model has space for a double-door fridge and under-counter washing machine

The 18,000-lb (8,000-kg) Cube Two X launched for preorder last week at promotional pricing starting at $98,000. That sounds like quite a break from the $336,900 median 2020 sales price of a new single-family US home, but those homes have a median size of 2,333 square feet, according to data from the US Census Bureau, seven times the size of the Cube C2X. And the C2X price tag does not include options, customizations, hookup costs and other extras, not to mention the land necessary to drop it on.

Nestron ships worldwide, delivering each home as a single complete unit with built-in furnishings and equipment.

You can take a 2.5-minute virtual tour of the one-bedroom Cube 2 X in the video clip below or head to the photo gallery to go it at your own pace. The two-bedroom video can be found on Nestron's YouTube page.

C2X 1 BEDROOM VERSION PREVIEW

Source: Nestron

View gallery - 14 images
9 comments
9 comments
paul314
I wonder how quaint all the "smart" builtins will look 5, 10 or 20 years from now. And what provision there is for updating without ripping everything out and starting from scratch. The other thing about conventional houses is that they tend to last for 50-150 years -- limited lifetime should also be factored into the price of the modular versions.
Fairly Reasoner
A trailer with no wheels?
mediabeing
As one who has experienced decades of 'apartment hell', this looks like a dark future for humankind.
You're born and the government issues you your very own life cubicle. Ew.
RLevy
Exactly what problem is this mini home intended to solve? Existing recreational vehicle (Air Stream and others) companies already manufactured and support ‘mini homes’ on wheels with support from compatible appliance and other 12 volt, solar, and smart products. Take off the wheels, mount them on a foundation and you have a mini home. Seems like Nestron is a non-solution in search of a non-problem.
Catweazle
"The other thing about conventional houses is that they tend to last for 50-150 years"
Mine's lasted nearly 400 so far and is good for a lot more yet.
The 3+ foot walls act as a storage heater in winter and aircon in winter!
ADVENTUREMUFFINffin
Paul has a good point. The value of a tiny home sans land is zero after 20 years. It's the land that holds or increases its value. A $100k tiny home sans land depreciates at $417/month, which could be considered "rent". On top of this, one has to "rent" land-either directly or through the bank.
Aross
It looks like it could use some wheels.
vince
I wouldn't call that a 'master' bedroom ha. Way too cramped.
Daishi
Boxabl is building fold out single room houses for $50k (furnished) but they have a massive waiting list. They are perfect to put in the back yard of an existing house as a mother in law apartment or small rental unit. It's just a frame that uses common furniture and appliances so it could generally be maintained/serviced. A mortgage on one would be $200/month without a down payment so depreciation isn't that important. It's only $10k more expensive than an average car that depreciates in 5-10 years so there are worse investments to make. The goal for it is to transform housing costs by moving to automated manufacturing similar to the auto industry and using a modular approach like lego pieces for people needing multiple rooms. I spend more on maintenance alone for my house than a Boxabl costs.