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Sulfite-filtering Üllo aims to make wine-drinking less whine-inducing

Sulfite-filtering Üllo aims to...
The Üllo is claimed to filter most of the sulfite content from wine
The Üllo is claimed to filter most of the sulfite content from wine
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The Üllo consists of a silicone reservoir on top, a replaceable food-grade polymer filter in the middle, and an aerator on the bottom
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The Üllo consists of a silicone reservoir on top, a replaceable food-grade polymer filter in the middle, and an aerator on the bottom
The Üllo is placed on top of a glass, carafe or decanter, and then wine is poured through it
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The Üllo is placed on top of a glass, carafe or decanter, and then wine is poured through it
The Üllo reportedly reduces sulfites to a level of less than 10 parts-per-million
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The Üllo reportedly reduces sulfites to a level of less than 10 parts-per-million
The Üllo is claimed to filter most of the sulfite content from wine
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The Üllo is claimed to filter most of the sulfite content from wine
The Üllo also filters out sediments, and its aerator section can be mechanically "switched off" if not wanted
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The Üllo also filters out sediments, and its aerator section can be mechanically "switched off" if not wanted

Do you get itchy, cramped-up or wheezy from even a little bit of wine? It could be because you have a sulfite sensitivity. Sulfites are sulfur-based compounds that are added in the wine-making process to prevent bacterial growth – they keep the wine from spoiling while it's in transit and storage. Given that they're not needed once the wine has been poured, however, chemist James Kornacki has developed a device for reducing them at that point in the game – it's called the Üllo.

The Üllo consists of a silicone reservoir on top, a replaceable food-grade polymer filter in the middle, and an aerator on the bottom. The device is placed on top of a glass, carafe or decanter, and then wine is poured through it.

According to Kornacki, the filter reduces the sulfites to a level of less than 10 parts-per-million, which he says is in line with levels that occur in wine naturally. As a side benefit, the Üllo also filters out sediments, and its aerator section can be mechanically "switched off" if not wanted.

The Üllo also filters out sediments, and its aerator section can be mechanically "switched off" if not wanted
The Üllo also filters out sediments, and its aerator section can be mechanically "switched off" if not wanted

All that being said, does it affect the flavor of the wine? James says that it can, slightly, although that by removing some of the sulfites' bitter taste it can actually make the wine more appealing. In his tests, the majority of tasters reportedly preferred Üllo-filtered white wines, while showing no preference with reds.

If the Üllo sounds like your cup of ... wine, you can currently pre-order one (with five filters) through its Kickstarter campaign for US$50. The estimated retail price for that particular package is $70 – each filter can be used for one full bottle, or several individual glasses over a period of a week. Needless to say, if you have a serious sulfite allergy, you'll want to consult your doctor before using the thing.

More information on the device is available in the pitch video below.

Sources: Üllo, Kickstarter

Üllo: The Wine Purifier

3 comments
S Michael
Wow.... Finally something I can use. A little pricy, but at least I can now drink wine...
nicho
Or for a much cheaper and more convenient method, you could put some weak (a couple of percent) Hydrogen peroxide in an eye dropper and put one or two drops in your glass. That'll oxidize the sulfites. Yes they'll end up as sulphuric acid but not much and you won't notice it.
Kevin Ritchey
This is an expensive yet viable method for removing sulfites which add nothing in the way of positives to the flavors of wine.