Urban Transport

ONO pedal-electric delivery vehicle carries cargo in swappable modules

ONO pedal-electric delivery ve...
Unlike conventional delivery vans, the ONO can travel on both roads and bike paths
Unlike conventional delivery vans, the ONO can travel on both roads and bike paths
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Unlike conventional delivery vans, the ONO can travel on both roads and bike paths
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Unlike conventional delivery vans, the ONO can travel on both roads and bike paths
One of the ONO's container modules is loaded up, prior to coupling with the vehicle
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One of the ONO's container modules is loaded up, prior to coupling with the vehicle
Although the ONO is pedalled, its two rear hub motors provide plenty of assistance
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Although the ONO is pedalled, its two rear hub motors provide plenty of assistance
The ONO has a width of just 116 cm (45.7 in)
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The ONO has a width of just 116 cm (45.7 in)
The ONO has a top assisted speed of 25 km/h (16 mph)
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The ONO has a top assisted speed of 25 km/h (16 mph)
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For some urban deliveries, a conventional cargo bike is all that's needed. In cases where a bit more of a vehicle is required, however, the modular-loading pedal-electric ONO may be just the way to go.

Manufactured by German startup Onomotion, the ONO is designed for use by courier express parcel services. In fact, since the vehicle first debuted in 2020, several such European companies have started utilizing it.

It features a delta trike layout – one wheel in front, two in the back – and measures 340 cm long by 116 cm wide by 205 cm high (133.9 by 45.7 by 80.7 in). The driver/rider sits inside a fully weatherproof windshield-wiper-equipped cab, steering with a set of handlebars, and pedaling to provide propulsion.

Their pedaling power is augmented by two 125-watt rear-wheel-hub electric motors, taking the vehicle to a top assisted speed of 25 km/h (16 mph). Those motors are in turn powered by a quick-swappable 1,400-Wh GreenPack lithium battery, one charge of which is reportedly good for a range of up to 30 km (19 miles) – the range can be doubled by adding a second battery.

The ONO has a width of just 116 cm (45.7 in)
The ONO has a width of just 116 cm (45.7 in)

Additionally, for starting up from a stop, a throttle can be used to get the ONO up to 6 km/h (4 mph) without pedaling.

One of the vehicle's particularly interesting features, however, is its cargo-carrying system. This setup incorporates caster-wheeled container modules that can be rolled on and off of the vehicle's rear cargo bed via an integrated ramp, electronically coupling and uncoupling with the ONO as needed.

Utilizing these, the operator doesn't have to wait around while individual cargo items are loaded and unloaded. Instead, modules can be preloaded before the ONO arrives for pickup, and unloaded after it has departed from making a delivery.

One of the ONO's container modules is loaded up, prior to coupling with the vehicle
One of the ONO's container modules is loaded up, prior to coupling with the vehicle

Each module has a storage volume of over 2 cubic meters (70.6 cubic ft), and can carry up to 200 kg (441 lb). The ONO itself reportedly tips the scales at 235 kg (518 lb).

Some of the vehicle's other features include GPS tracking, a full lighting system, wing mirrors, an LCD dashboard display, plus an RFID fob used to lock and unlock the vehicle, open the container module door, and release the module from the back.

Onomotion is currently offering the ONO to prospective commercial clients in several European countries, either for outright purchase or on a subscription basis – rates for the latter start at €490 (about US$534) per month.

Source: Onomotion

View gallery - 5 images
4 comments
4 comments
paul314
If these "bikes" are going to be on bike paths (which are often mixed pedestrian and bicycle) I hope the drivers will be particularly well-rewarded for caution rather than speed. Because anyone who gets hit by one of these carrying a full cargo load is going to be in a world of trouble.
EH
Yep, Paul is right, it's a "bike". Half a metric tonne fully laden with rider, 250W of motor, a thrilling 49 seconds + to reach its top speed of 25 kph. And I can rent one for just double my car payment... hooold me back!
ljaques
I have trouble imagining that a 250W motor and 1.4kWh battery will move around 700+ pounds for 30 for 60km in a charge. So, how does one pedal around a dead-batteried ONO?
This reminds me of the old joke of the ONO bird, whose pecker was longer than its legs. Every time it came in for a landing, it would scream "Oh no! Oh no! Oh no! "
I'm with EH: HOLD ME BACK!
ReservoirPup
agree with all previous comments. even at 20-25 km/h, 500 kg is hella heavy to fly by cyclists. 250W of motor action is a joke