Urban Transport

Polestar debuts its Re:Move electric sled for inner-city cargo hauling

Polestar debuts its Re:Move el...
The Re:Move electric cargo mover prototype in action
The Re:Move electric cargo mover prototype in action
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A render of the Re:Move electric transporter
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A render of the Re:Move electric transporter
The Re:Move is powered by a 2.2-kWh battery pack
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The Re:Move is powered by a 2.2-kWh battery pack
The Re:Move electric cargo mover prototype in action
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The Re:Move electric cargo mover prototype in action
The Re:Move electric cargo mover features a tilting
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The Re:Move electric cargo mover features a tilting mechanism for better maneuverability
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Earlier this year, Volvo-owned Polestar signaled its intentions to move beyond electric cars and into other forms of clean transport, introducing an electric transporter concept for carrying goods around urban areas. The company has now turned up to IAA 2021 in Germany with a fully-functioning prototype, which carries with it a few new details around how a production version of the so-called urban "sled" will work.

The Re:Move electric cargo mover concept was first revealed back in March and featured a highly practical flatbed design just begging to be loaded up with boxes, bags or other cargo. While originally listed as 600 lb (275 kg), the payload capacity has now been pared back to 396 lb (180 kg), though the Re:Move maintains a slim profile designed to suit most bike lanes, measuring just 750 mm (30 in) across.

The Re:Move electric cargo mover features a tilting
The Re:Move electric cargo mover features a tilting mechanism for better maneuverability

Made from recyclable aluminum, the Re:Move's chassis is fitted with an electric tilting mechanism to lean into corners and allow for a tight turning circle of less than 7 m (23 ft). A damped rear swing arm should make the ride a little less jarring for the people and items onboard, and disc brakes also feature for greater stopping power.

A 2.2-kWh battery pack powers the whole operation, with the Re:Move limited to a maximum speed of 25 km/h (15.5 mph) in line with the electric bicycle laws of many jurisdictions. Always-on front lighting, brake lights, a horn and optional indicators are also onboard for the purposes of safety.

The Re:Move is powered by a 2.2-kWh battery pack
The Re:Move is powered by a 2.2-kWh battery pack

The Re:Move is the result of a collaboration between Polestar, e-bike-maker Cake, aluminum manufacturer Hydro, Wallpaper magazine, and industrial designer Konstantin Grcic. There are no figures offered on range at this point, nor on price or availability, but the designers are positioning the Re:Move as a cleaner alternative to delivery vans in cities, or even as a cargo transportation solution in rural areas.

“The passion and expertise our partners have brought to this project shows the power of great design,” says Thomas Ingenlath, Polestar CEO. “Electrifying vehicles is the start point, not the end game. Our engineers have proven that this kind of open collaboration will accelerate innovation and the shift to truly sustainable mobility.”

Source: Polestar

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4 comments
4 comments
Daishi
Micro mobility and platforms like this are really efficient but people come out with stuff like this and everyone wants to figure out how to classify and regulate it or impose restrictions to comply with regulations. It took years of legal battles, loopholes, and court cases be to get ebikes on the streets of NYC and they still get impounded even as recently as a few years ago. Police are passing 6000 lb SUV's that get 18 MPG and have top speeds over 120 MPH to impound ebikes that get 1,000 MPGe for not complying with local regulations. If governments cared about the environment more than just lip service they would lift all restrictions on anything that gets over 750 MPGe to stop stifling innovation. Your odds of being killed by a person on an ebike are probably about the same as the odds of being bludgeoned to death by a ukulele. Governments should end micro-mobility prohibition.
DrDlDoe
Boy, dreamers with big money and no concept of real world operations! First; absolutely useless in the rain or snow unless covered with....what? dreaded plastic sheeting! "Nice flat surface - sure, and nothing to keep the cargo from sliding - not that there are potholes, bumps, curbs and lumpy asphalt in the world. Brilliant. And when the jockey stops to make a delivery that's only part of the load....who the hell guards the goods left on the cart? Even more brilliant. If I were a thief in a big city (imagine that!), I'd just follow one of these suckers around and grab off it at the first opportunity. AND! a 23-foot turning radius is "small"?? Are you living in LaLaLand? My Mini turns in less than that, as does my 1989 Jeep. And the tilting to make "turning easier"...yeah, it's a lot easier when all the packages slide off. Get a grip on the real world and stop wasting time and money trying to justify your paycheck.
ljaques
Cool, but the cargo is not secure from pilfering, and the cargo, cart, and driver are not secure from CENTRIPETAL ERRORS. (see image 4 for the first clue)
ScienceFan
DrDIDoe, I guess you are not living in a country where pot holes get fixed by a functioning government and poverty is not so rampant that everything gets stolen. Or where people can read a weather forecast and decide on their mode of transport. Countries that take bike lanes serious don’t have curbs. Perhaps you should fix all of that first before criticising others.