Urban Transport

Vinci ebike looks a little bit retro, and a little bit modern art

Vinci ebike looks a little bit...
The Vinci ebike is presently on Kickstarter
The Vinci ebike is presently on Kickstarter
View 3 Images
The Vinci ebike is presently on Kickstarter
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The Vinci ebike is presently on Kickstarter
The Vinci is reportedly designed to put its user in an optimum riding position
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The Vinci is reportedly designed to put its user in an optimum riding position
The Vinci has a top speed of 25 mph (40 km/h) in Eco Mode, or 35 mph (56 km/h) in Sport Mode
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The Vinci has a top speed of 25 mph (40 km/h) in Eco Mode, or 35 mph (56 km/h) in Sport Mode
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There are some ebikes that try to look like regular bicycles, some that try to look like classic motorcycles, and others that aim for a quirky design that isn't entirely either of the other two. The Vinci definitely falls into the last group.

Created by California-based mechanical engineer and industrial designer Enzo Prathamesh Shinde, the Vinci ebike is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign.

Its most distinctive feature is its frame's aluminum alloy top tube, which essentially takes the form of a long fat cylinder that's diagonally sliced and offset half-way along its length. The padded seat is recessed into the top of that cylinder, plus a 2,300-lumen dual-beam LED headlight occupies the entire front end, while an 800-lumen dual-beam tail light takes up the rear. Both are IP67 waterproof, meaning they can be immersed to a depth of 1 meter (3.3 feet) for 30 minutes.

The Vinci is reportedly designed to put its user in an optimum riding position
The Vinci is reportedly designed to put its user in an optimum riding position

We have seen a similar tubular design before, in both the Pocket Rocket and the Punch Moto. The former isn't a true ebike, though, in that it doesn't have pedals, while the former is an outright electric motorcycle.

By contrast, the Vinci does have a pedal drivetrain, which is assisted by a 750-W rear hub motor. That motor is powered by a 48-V/15-Ah lithium battery located underneath the seat. One charge is claimed to be good for a throttle-only range of 30 miles (48 km), or up to 50 miles (80 km) if the rider pedals. The vehicle has a top speed of 25 mph (40 km/h) in Eco Mode, or 35 mph (56 km/h) in Sport Mode.

Riders can check on stats such as current speed and battery charge level via a color LCD display that's recessed into the top tube. Some of the Vinci's other features include a Shimano 7-speed drivetrain, front and rear suspension, hydraulic disc brakes, an anti-theft alarm, a GPS tracker, plus 20-inch aluminum alloy wheels with Kenda 4-inch fat tires.

The whole thing reportedly tips the scales at 70 lb (32 kg), and supports a maximum rider weight of 300 lb (136 kg).

Assuming the Kickstarter project is successful and the Vinci reaches production, a pledge of US$999 will get you one of your own. Delivery is scheduled to take place next May. You can see the ebike in action, in the video below.

Vinci ebike Kickstarter pitch

Source: Kickstarter

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4 comments
4 comments
Michael son of Lester
I looked at the video and the photos, the first thing that came to mind was, that seat looks uncomfortable. Then there's the video of the guy cruising around without peddeling. The stated range is listed as 30 miles without peddling. As a guy who owns an extended-range e-bike, I call BS. It may be possible but I would only believe it if I saw it done.
nick101
As a previous poster has said, it looks uncomfortable. I don't know about range, I peddle out of habit, but a detachable battery would be better.
Tristan P
The "hydraulic breaks" sound interesting. Is that stopping because it's raining? It does have a distinctive look, that's for sure.
Nelson Hyde Chick
I don't think they will be able to deliver at the price point they state.