Tiny Houses

Wanderlust tiny house is built for the road

Wanderlust tiny house is built...
Rocky Mountain Tiny Houses delivered the Wanderlust unfinished
Rocky Mountain Tiny Houses delivered the Wanderlust unfinished
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Rocky Mountain Tiny Houses delivered the Wanderlust unfinished
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Rocky Mountain Tiny Houses delivered the Wanderlust unfinished
View towards the Wanderlust's living room 
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View towards the Wanderlust's living room 
The Wanderlust measures just 24 ft (7 m) long
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The Wanderlust measures just 24 ft (7 m) long
The Wanderlust's small loft bedroom 
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The Wanderlust's small loft bedroom 
The Wanderlust's storage-integrated staircase
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The Wanderlust's storage-integrated staircase
The Wanderlust's kitchen area
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The Wanderlust's kitchen area
The Wanderlust's shower
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The Wanderlust's shower
View towards the Wanderlust's living room and door
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View towards the Wanderlust's living room and door
The Wanderlust is heated and cooled with a mini-split
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The Wanderlust is heated and cooled with a mini-split
The Wanderlust's ceiling 
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The Wanderlust's ceiling 
The Wanderlust's bathroom sink
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The Wanderlust's bathroom sink
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Durango, Colorado-based Rocky Mountain Tiny Houses recently completed a new tiny house for a military couple requiring a towable home they can take wherever they're stationed. Named the Wanderlust, it's a compact model measuring just 24 ft (7 m) long, so should be relatively easy to tow.

If the Wanderlust's shed-like design looks a little familiar, that's probably because it's partly based on the Shedsistence tiny house (as well as the Tiny Lab), and the home stands out with its metal cladding and wooden accenting. Structurally, it consists of SIPs (structurally insulated panels) and is based on a double-axle trailer.

Like the Shedsistence, the Wanderlust has a small storage room for stowing outdoors gear. This is separate from the rest of the home and is accessed from the outside with its own door. Inside the home proper, the ground floor is raised a little, except in the living room, which is reached by descending a couple of steps and contains a couch and some storage space.

Nearby is the kitchenette, which includes an apron sink, propane-powered gas range cooker, a washer/dryer combo, fridge/freezer, and some storage space. Continuing to the end of the home reveals a snug bathroom with shower, vessel sink, and composting toilet.

The Wanderlust's kitchen area
The Wanderlust's kitchen area

The Wanderlust's storage-integrated staircase leads up to the sole bedroom loft, which is situated above the living room and has enough space to squeeze in a queen-sized mattress. It's topped by a skylight.

The Wanderlust is heated by a mini-split system, and a heat recovery ventilation system is also installed. An 80-gallon (302-l) freshwater tank and 60-gallon (227-l) greywater tank, plus some extra storage space, are tucked away beneath its raised floor. All electrical lines are left visible, both for easier access and because the owners like the utilitarian look.

Rocky Mountain Tiny Houses delivered the Wanderlust to its new owners Great Falls, Montana, unfinished. The firm agreed to do as much work on the home as it could manage for US$67,000 and estimates it's about 98 percent complete, with just a few finishing touches still to do.

Source: Rocky Mountain Tiny Houses

View gallery - 11 images
2 comments
Fairly Reasoner
It's built for the road because it's a TRAILER.
Tom Lee Mullins
It is a cross between a camper and a house. I like it.