Tiny Houses

Compact tiny house expands in size to offer more living space

The Aurora can optionally run off-the-grid with a solar power and composting toilet setup
The Aurora can optionally run off-the-grid with a solar power and composting toilet setup
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An optional washer/dryer can be installed in the Aurora's bathroom
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An optional washer/dryer can be installed in the Aurora's bathroom
The Aurora's shower 
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The Aurora's shower 
The Aurora's bathroom sink
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The Aurora's bathroom sink
The Aurora's office space turns into a bedroom with a Murphy-style drop-down bed
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The Aurora's office space turns into a bedroom with a Murphy-style drop-down bed
The Aurora's office/bedroom, with bed stowed away
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The Aurora's office/bedroom, with bed stowed away
Top-down view of the Aurora's dining area
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Top-down view of the Aurora's dining area
The tiny house weighs roughly 16,000 lb (7,250 kg)) and is constructed from structural insulated panels
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The tiny house weighs roughly 16,000 lb (7,250 kg)) and is constructed from structural insulated panels
The Aurora looks a bit more like a studio apartment than a typical tiny house thanks to its extra width
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The Aurora looks a bit more like a studio apartment than a typical tiny house thanks to its extra width
The Aurora can optionally run off-the-grid with a solar power and composting toilet setup
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The Aurora can optionally run off-the-grid with a solar power and composting toilet setup
The Aurora measures just 26 ft (8 m)-long
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The Aurora measures just 26 ft (8 m)-long
When in its expanded position, the Aurora measures 374 sq ft (sq m)
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When in its expanded position, the Aurora measures 374 sq ft (sq m)
Slide-out sections of wall are installed in the Aurora and controllable with a push of a button thanks to an electric motor mechanism
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Slide-out sections of wall are installed in the Aurora and controllable with a push of a button thanks to an electric motor mechanism
The Aurora is designed by Canadian firm Zero Squared
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The Aurora is designed by Canadian firm Zero Squared
The Aurora can optionally run off-the-grid with a solar power and composting toilet setup
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The Aurora can optionally run off-the-grid with a solar power and composting toilet setup
The Aurora's kitchen area
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The Aurora's kitchen area
The Aurora's living room
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The Aurora's living room
When in its expanded position, the Aurora measures 374 sq ft (sq m) of floorspace
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When in its expanded position, the Aurora measures 374 sq ft (sq m) of floorspace

Last year we reported on a really neat tiny house concept called the Aurora that promised to grow in width at the push of a button, allowing it to be both compact (and road-legal) to tow, and spacious while stationary. The novel dwelling, designed by Canada's Zero Squared, is now on the market for US$88,900.

The Aurora measures just 26 ft (8 m)-long, so it should be relatively easy to tow. An electric motor mechanism pushes the slide-out sections of its walls to increase total width from 8.6 ft (2.6 m) when towing to 15.10 ft (4.6 m) when parked up. In its expanded state, the home offers a total of 374 sq ft (sq m) of floorspace.

To get some context on the extra space the Aurora's slide-outs provide, it includes almost the same floorspace as the much larger 32 ft-long Sakura and 38-ft long English Rose homes. We should also mention that slide-outs have long been used in RV's and the Aurora isn't the only tiny house with slide-outs on the market either.

Judging by the photos, the Aurora's interior layout looks a bit more like a studio apartment than a typical tiny house, thanks to its extra width. It includes an office that turns into a bedroom using a Murphy-style drop-down bed, a living room with sofa, dining area and bathroom with shower, sink, and toilet.

When in its expanded position, the Aurora measures 374 sq ft (sq m) of floorspace
When in its expanded position, the Aurora measures 374 sq ft (sq m) of floorspace

The kitchen has a pantry and full-size stainless steel appliances, and either solid oak or birch countertops. An upstairs loft is available solely for storage.

The Aurora is rated at a total weight of around 16,000 lb (7,250 kg) and constructed using structural insulated panels. Power comes from an RV-style hookup as standard but the home can also be upgraded to run totally off-the-grid with a solar power system and composting toilet. Additional upgrades include a mini-split air-con unit, compact dishwasher, and different furniture options.

Delivery for the Aurora is available throughout North America and build time is estimated for around six to eight weeks.

Source: Zero Squared

5 comments
Joshua Tulberg
love it.
Fairly Reasoner
So, are you interested in a TINY house, or not?
IvanWashington
pricey. a tin can [metal mobile] is cheaper and just as practical.
EUbrainwashing
I like to look at property for sale in North America and for 88,000 USD you can buy, in many areas, a house with land (undoubtedly already including a big wooden shed) of sufficient quality that you can live 'off grid' no problem AND with the change buy a large travel trailer too. Just saying. Of cause: the Agenda 21 UN babble-speak is selling the idea that humans reduce their living to the absolute minimum (but it will be us all jam-packed into mega-cities we will not be allowed in the wilds) and I see this apparent infatuation with 'micro-homes' as the presstitutes and the man-made-carbon obsessed cult's feeble minded solution to a manufactured non-problem.
toyhouse
A tiny house with a slide-out. Why everyone doesn't do this has always been a mystery to me, unless folks actually want to live in something the size of a closet. Anyway, recreational makers have been making similar things forever. Trailers with multiple slide-outs and lighter weight construction making them easier to tow than one of these. No need to build something so small with 2x4's and plywood construction methods. Overkill I think. But I get it. Folks want custom, (like a custom home only tiny),. If it's not to be towed often, the weight wouldn't matter as much. Maybe recreational companies should get in on the act! Bare walls with modular interior options and layouts. And perhaps offer special lightweight customizing options for the exterior - siding/roofing etc.? Seems there's a market for it. With their scale of manufacturing, seems it'd be cheaper than a custom. More consistent construction as well. We just looked at a custom and the construction was beyond shoddy. Not any better than a tool shed thrown together. Just thinking out loud.