Automotive

Ford F-150 Lightning surpasses estimates with 320-mile EPA range

Ford F-150 Lightning surpasses...
A pre-production F-150 Lightning does some cold-weather testing in Alaska
A pre-production F-150 Lightning does some cold-weather testing in Alaska
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Ford readies the F-150 Lightning for spring deliveries
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Ford readies the F-150 Lightning for spring deliveries
For most people, the Chicago Auto Show is the first chance to see the Ford F-150 Lightning electric pickup truck in the sheet metal
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For most people, the Chicago Auto Show is the first chance to see the Ford F-150 Lightning electric pickup truck in the sheet metal
A pre-production F-150 Lightning does some cold-weather testing in Alaska
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A pre-production F-150 Lightning does some cold-weather testing in Alaska
F-150 Lightning pre-production at Ford's Rouge Electric Vehicle Center
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F-150 Lightning pre-production at Ford's Rouge Electric Vehicle Center
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When Ford introduced the F-150 Lightning nearly a year ago, it gave range estimates between 230 and 300 miles for its all-electric pickup, dependent upon battery size and trim. That first figure is spot on, according to the EPA, but the second is actually a little low. Lightning reservation holders will be happy to note that the EPA estimates the highest range figure at 320 miles.

Ford was happy to announce today that final EPA testing for the Lightning is complete, and the numbers are looking better than anticipated. The 320-mile (515-km) estimated range is found on extended-range battery variants of the Lightning Pro fleet model and the XLT and Lariat trims, scoring an extra 20 miles (32 km) over Ford's target range of 300 miles (483 km). The flagship Lightning Platinum trim, which comes standard with the extended-range battery, also scores 20 miles over Ford's initial targets with its 300-mile EPA estimate.

Ford readies the F-150 Lightning for spring deliveries
Ford readies the F-150 Lightning for spring deliveries

No Lightning model scored lower than Ford's original targets, but standard-range battery-equipped models came in right at the 230 miles (370 km) Ford announced at the truck's debut. So there's really no bad range news for reservation holders and prospective buyers.

The EPA testing was one of the final steps ahead of the start of Lightning production and first deliveries planned for Spring 2022 (Northern Hemisphere). While the sub-$40K Pro models are currently only for fleet customers, buyers can get a 230-mile standard-range XLT for prices starting at $54,669 after destination charge but before government incentives. To dial things up to 320 miles, buyers will be looking at a base price of $74,169 for the extended-range XLT.

F-150 Lightning pre-production at Ford's Rouge Electric Vehicle Center
F-150 Lightning pre-production at Ford's Rouge Electric Vehicle Center

At the other end of the pricing chart, the flagship Platinum model starts at $92,569, including destination charge.

All F-150 Lightning models come powered by a dual-motor electric drive that delivers full-time 4x4. Ford is targeting a max output of 426 hp (318 kW) when wired up to the standard-range lithium-ion battery and up to 563 hp (420 kW) when power comes from the extended-range battery.

Source: Ford

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4 comments
4 comments
vince
Not many folks are gonna be able to swing that $74,474 price for an XLT long range and up. Of course all of those rich ranchers and farmers will be able to but then that's not a typical US family.
foxpup
..stoooopid huge price numbers...no good for the masses If you can't afford it, it's not a good pickup.
Bobby LeBo
Wonder what the price would be if the truck had 275 HP?
ljaques
In 2007, I picked up my Tundra from Toyota for $23,100, including add-ons. The Ford dealership had F-150s priced from $40k-55k that year! Alas, they still don't have a hybrid Tundra, let alone a plug-in. The cheaper Tesla Cybertruck, when it comes out, will scoop all those Ford buyers right up at the $30k lower price. Prior to the Tundra, I was a Ford man, too, but I've become entirely alienated by Detroit for a long time now. Ford and GM may trot out some new EVs, but I doubt they'll make a go of it, unless they incorporate better guts into them and drop the prices by 50%. And that's only if the inflation doesn't keep eating our paychecks.