Automotive

McLaren validates the Speedtail hypercar's 250-mph VMAX, repeatedly

McLaren validates the Speedtai...
McLaren's "Hyper-GT" Speedtail has been out testing its maximum speed in Florida
McLaren's "Hyper-GT" Speedtail has been out testing its maximum speed in Florida
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The aptly-named Speedtail has been out testing its maximum speed
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The aptly-named Speedtail has been out testing its maximum speed
An extraordinary-looking vehicle needs an extraordinary powerplant
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An extraordinary-looking vehicle needs an extraordinary powerplant
Under the covers: the Speedtail in the workshop
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Under the covers: the Speedtail in the workshop
McLaren's "Hyper-GT" Speedtail has been out testing its maximum speed in Florida
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McLaren's "Hyper-GT" Speedtail has been out testing its maximum speed in Florida
The combustion engine does the bulk of the work; the electric part is mainly there to deliver instant torque when required
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The combustion engine does the bulk of the work; the electric part is mainly there to deliver instant torque when required
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McLaren has spilled the beans on the hybrid powertrain at the heart of its outrageous Speedtail three-seat hypercar. It'll get the job done with a 4-liter twin turbo combustion engine and a Formula E-derived electric motor combining for 1,055 horsepower.

On the combustion side: 747 healthy ponies and 800 Nm (590 lb-ft) of torque. A single electric motor then contributes "more than 230 kW" (310 horsepower) on top. That's a decent total, but it's the design and packaging of this motor that McLaren's most proud of.

The motor, including its cooling and integration components, is super lightweight, delivering 8.3 kW/kg, a figure McLaren says "is twice the efficiency of an average sports car" – are we talking about electric motors here or comparing it to the power density of a gasoline engine? Who knows?

The aptly-named Speedtail has been out testing its maximum speed
The aptly-named Speedtail has been out testing its maximum speed

The Speedtail's hybrid system is purely there to fill in power gaps and will offer virtually zero in the way of all-electric range. The battery pack stores just 1.647 kWh, but has "the best power-to-weight ratio of any high voltage battery available today." So it's capable of putting out or recouping significant gobs of energy quickly. To make sure that doesn't cause thermal issues, there's a dielectrical cooling system, which sees the cells permanently immersed in cooling oil.

McLaren has been out in Florida, repeatedly validating the Speedtail's 250-mph (403-km/h) top speed in what looks like a rather fun process, the test driver sitting front and center in a three-seater cockpit that recalls the mighty McLaren F1. Enjoy a video below.

Speedtail: Achieving the Maximum

Source: McLaren

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4 comments
McDesign
Whoa - does it have those spinner hubcaps that stay stationary? Rad!
JDoughy
Nice, but they're over 30 years behind, not to mention the striking resemblance to the Oldsmobile Aerotech. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oldsmobile_Aerotech
ljaques
Wow, McLaren finally delivered a mudcat. Whose =kid= designed that? Pretty specs, but looks that only a Mother could love.
buzzclick
The Speedtail design is cool, but McLaren went a little too far with the rear end. From the side the car looks excessively long.