Automotive

Rivian plots "Adventure Network" of EV chargers across North America

Rivian plots "Adventure Networ...
Similar to Tesla's network of Superchargers that continues to sprawl across the world, Rivian's Adventure Network will be purpose-built for owners of its electric vehicles
Similar to Tesla's network of Superchargers that continues to sprawl across the world, Rivian's Adventure Network will be purpose-built for owners of its electric vehicles
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Rivian is building a nationwide network of fast-charging stations that can add as much as 140 miles (225 km) worth of juice in as little as 20 minutes
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Rivian is building a nationwide network of fast-charging stations that can add as much as 140 miles (225 km) worth of juice in as little as 20 minutes
Similar to Tesla's network of Superchargers that continues to sprawl across the world, Rivian's Adventure Network will be purpose-built for owners of its electric vehicles
2/3
Similar to Tesla's network of Superchargers that continues to sprawl across the world, Rivian's Adventure Network will be purpose-built for owners of its electric vehicles
A map depicting locations for the Rivian Adventure Network of EV chargers
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A map depicting locations for the Rivian Adventure Network of EV chargers
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Automotive startup Rivian is starting to make some waves in the electric vehicle space, debuting a pickup truck and SUV at the same LA Auto Show in 2018 and since catching the eye of some very notable customers, such as Amazon. The company is now expanding on its vision of how its head-turning duo will power their way across North America, announcing plans for a nationwide network of fast-charging stations that can add as much as 140 miles (225 km) worth of juice in as little as 20 minutes.

Similar to Tesla's network of Superchargers that continues to sprawl across the world, Rivian's Adventure Network will be purpose-built for owners of its electric vehicles, with the aim of minimizing their roadside plug-in time. The company says the network will cover popular routes across the US and Canada, and will include more than 3,500 chargers at 600 sites by the end of 2023.

These sites with multiple DC fast chargers will be powered by 100 percent renewable energy, and will be built on highways, main roads, cafes and shops, according to the company. The 140-mile range from a 20-minute charge is promised for both the R1T pickup and the R1S SUV courtesy of 200 kW charging rates, with the cars' in-vehicle navigation able to automatically plot the charging points en route to the user's destination.

A map depicting locations for the Rivian Adventure Network of EV chargers
A map depicting locations for the Rivian Adventure Network of EV chargers

Where the Adventure Network will be exclusively available for Rivian owners, the company is also building out a network of Level 2AC chargers for the general EV owners with a J1772 plug. More than 10,000 of these Rivian Waypoint chargers are expected to be in place by the end of 2023, offering 11.5-kW charging speeds from shops, restaurants, hotels and parks, along with all 42 Colorado State Parks where the first installations will start in July.

Source: Rivian

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7 comments
7 comments
CAVUMark
We need stations that can charge any EV. This will help with the acceptance rate of EVs as a reliable alternative to ICE.
Karmudjun
More power to Rivian – more chargers and a nice looking truck! But proprietary charger stations? Compatible technology chargers at an affordable price (or rate per charge) will make the high price tag easier to take, and make rapid charging stations profitable for third party operators. Can you imagine a world with similar rapid charge technologies all over the place and third parties selling “Charge Adapters” to allow Teslas to charge on Rivian chargers and visa-versa?
Daishi
It is troubling/concerning that an EV startup that has not shipped vehicles yet had decided that they need a proprietary charging technology. It's not really a dig at Rivian as much as it is a reflection of how far behind the standard form factor chargers still are. Even within existing chargers like J1772 or CHAdeMO there are multiple versions based that have the extra high voltage charging pins or don't. The Tesla plug is a fraction of the size because it starting based on the high voltage pins rather than just adding them below the plug later as an afterthought like J1772 and CHAdeMO. I'm sure that's why Rivian made their own format too but the auto industry should address it with something better.
TpPa
I agree with CAVUMark, I think that the market should be mandated that all vehicles, and charging stations use the same connectors world wide. It is such a waste of resources to have a station filled with brand specific charges.
ljaques
Yeah, ideally, all chargers would have adapters there for charging all makes and models of EVs. But Rivian may have a good idea. Since there are far more Teslas out there, with the much higher traffic at each charging point, Rivian keeps their traffic low and customer satisfaction high with their proprietary points. And I think that Rivian will be selling a metric sh*tload of those trucks. They're purt darn nice.
Doodah
The question, to me is: If I was a Rivian driver, would I rather have a car that can also charge on the tesla network and deal with potential teslas in my own network? Or would I rather just leave my faith with Rivian and have less Teslas clogging up the chargers. I think probably the latter.
rchiiibob
What about, if the electric vehicle is built with an engine, that runs on regular, unleaded gasoline? It powers two alternators, that charge the electrical batteries, while you drive! No need for charging stations! Maybe these engines can be built, where the alternators help the engine to use half the fuel, greatly extending the gas mileage? Seems possible to me.