Tiny Houses

Valhalla tiny house fits a family of three into 20 feet

Valhalla tiny house fits a fam...
The recently-completed Valhalla measures 6 m (19.6 ft) long
The recently-completed Valhalla measures 6 m (19.6 ft) long
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The Valhalla is finished in red cedar with white accenting, and is topped by a teal roof
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The Valhalla is finished in red cedar with white accenting, and is topped by a teal roof
The Valhalla's loft bedroom includes a small bedside table
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The Valhalla's loft bedroom includes a small bedside table
The Valhalla's downstairs bedroom is being used as a child's bedroom, but Baluchon says it can comfortably fit a double bed
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The Valhalla's downstairs bedroom is being used as a child's bedroom, but Baluchon says it can comfortably fit a double bed
The Valhalla's downstairs bedroom is located underneath the living room and given privacy by curtains
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The Valhalla's downstairs bedroom is located underneath the living room and given privacy by curtains
The Valhalla's downstairs bedroom includes a couple of closets
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The Valhalla's downstairs bedroom includes a couple of closets
The Valhalla is based on a double-axle trailer 
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The Valhalla is based on a double-axle trailer 
The Valhalla's main bedroom is a typical tiny house loft-style bedroom and includes a double bed
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The Valhalla's main bedroom is a typical tiny house loft-style bedroom and includes a double bed
Closeup detail shot of the Valhalla's kitchen cabinets 
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Closeup detail shot of the Valhalla's kitchen cabinets 
The Valhalla's main bedroom is accessed by floating stairs
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The Valhalla's main bedroom is accessed by floating stairs
Closeup detail shot of the Valhalla's floating stairs
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Closeup detail shot of the Valhalla's floating stairs
The Valhalla's bathroom includes shower and toilet – but no sink 
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The Valhalla's bathroom includes shower and toilet – but no sink 
The Valhalla's living room is raised and includes a sofa 
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The Valhalla's living room is raised and includes a sofa 
To reach the main bedroom, the owners must first climb atop the desk and then use the stairs
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To reach the main bedroom, the owners must first climb atop the desk and then use the stairs
The Valhalla is finished in red cedar with white accenting and topped by a teal roof
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The Valhalla is finished in red cedar with white accenting and topped by a teal roof
The Valhalla manages to squeeze in a lot of house into such a small space
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The Valhalla manages to squeeze in a lot of house into such a small space
The Valhalla's loft bedroom includes a double bed 
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The Valhalla's loft bedroom includes a double bed 
View towards the Valhalla's kitchen. The bathroom is behind the door pictured 
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View towards the Valhalla's kitchen. The bathroom is behind the door pictured 
View towards the Valhalla's living room. The downstairs bedroom really does look very small in this shot
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View towards the Valhalla's living room. The downstairs bedroom really does look very small in this shot
The Valhalla's bathroom includes a dry toilet 
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The Valhalla's bathroom includes a dry toilet 
The steps leading up to the Valhalla's living room have integrated storage 
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The steps leading up to the Valhalla's living room have integrated storage 
The Valhalla's shower
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The Valhalla's shower
The Valhalla's living room 
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The Valhalla's living room 
The Valhalla sports porthole-style windows
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The Valhalla sports porthole-style windows
The recently-completed Valhalla measures 6 m (19.6 ft) long
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The recently-completed Valhalla measures 6 m (19.6 ft) long
View gallery - 24 images

We've previously written about how France's relatively strict towing laws mean tiny houses in the country must be much lighter than those in North America, naturally resulting in smaller homes. Despite these restrictions, Baluchon managed to build a tiny house that serves as home to a family of three, and can even sleep double that, at a squeeze.

The Valhalla measures 6 m (19.6 ft) long and is based on a double-axle trailer. It's clad in red cedar with white accenting, and its three porthole-style windows lend it a distinctive look that helps it stand out from Baluchon's considerable back catalog of similarly-sized tiny houses.

Inside, the home is finished in spruce wood. Visitors enter into the kitchen area, which includes cabinets, a microwave, two-burner propane-powered stove, fridge, and sink.

A nearby door provides access to a small bathroom with a shower and toilet. However, there's no sink in there, so people will have to use the kitchen sink after nature has called. This obviously isn't ideal, and it's a shame the firm couldn't shoehorn in one of the tiny sinks that Minimaliste installed in the Eucalyptus.

View towards the Valhalla's kitchen. The bathroom is behind the door pictured 
View towards the Valhalla's kitchen. The bathroom is behind the door pictured 

Elsewhere on the Valhalla's first floor lies a small room separated from the main living space by curtains. Given its proportions, you could be forgiven for mistaking it for storage space, but it currently serves as a child's bedroom. Indeed, Baluchon says it can comfortably host two child-sized beds, or one double bed.

Next to this is a desk. The owners must climb atop it and then onto some floating stairs to access the main bedroom, which is a typical loft-style bedroom with a double bed.

A few storage-integrated steps lead up to the raised living room, which has a sofa, table, and some shelving. Baluchon rates the Valhalla's maximum capacity as six, presumably including a sofa bed – though this does seem like a bit too much of a squeeze to us, except perhaps for guests staying over for short visits.

The Valhalla's living room is raised and includes a sofa 
The Valhalla's living room is raised and includes a sofa 

The Valhalla gets power from a standard RV-style hookup, and its insulation consists of sheep's wool for the floor, cotton, linen and hemp in the walls, and wood fiber in the ceiling. We've no word on its cost, but those interested can get in touch with the firm.

Source: Baluchon (in French)

View gallery - 24 images
1 comment
Wolf0579
I still don't think America is as fascinated with these things as the media appears to be.
The only compelling reason to be interested in one is if you are already homeless. As indeed, much of America's middle class found themselves as the 1percent sent all their jobs to the third world.