Tiny Houses

Escape goes old school with Vintage tiny house

The Vintage starts at US$59,800
The Vintage starts at US$59,800
View 10 Images
The tiny house sports cedar siding
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The tiny house sports cedar siding
Inside the ground-floor bedroom
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Inside the ground-floor bedroom
Heating and cooling comes via a mini-split air-con unit 
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Heating and cooling comes via a mini-split air-con unit 
The main living space, with kitchen, dining area, and lounge area
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The main living space, with kitchen, dining area, and lounge area
The folding dining table
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The folding dining table
A ladder leads to the upstairs sleeping loft
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A ladder leads to the upstairs sleeping loft
The Vintage starts at US$59,800
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The Vintage starts at US$59,800
The sole upstairs sleeping loft, though another can be added at cost
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The sole upstairs sleeping loft, though another can be added at cost
The bathroom includes a toilet, shower/tub, storage, and space for a washer/dryer
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The bathroom includes a toilet, shower/tub, storage, and space for a washer/dryer
View towards the shower/tub
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View towards the shower/tub

We've been impressed with each towable tiny house that Escape has released thus far, and both the Traveler and the Vista in particular offer a lot of home in a little package. Its latest dwelling, the Vintage, maintains this quality but drops the firm's usual modern styling in favor of a more traditional look. Inside, it features a relatively large bathroom and kitchen, and can sleep up to six people.

Measuring 25 ft (7.6 m) long and comprising a maximum total floorspace of 315 sq ft (29 sq m), the Vintage reflects its name with cottage-like styling that includes cedar siding, a large gable roof, and a total of 12 opening windows (the window boxes pictured are an optional extra).

The interior is dominated by a large living space, which includes kitchen, dining area, and lounge. The kitchen includes plenty of shelving and cupboard storage, in addition to a refrigerator, sink, butcher block countertops, and two-burner stove.

A folding table serves as dining table and there's enough room left over to squeeze in a couch and a wall-mounted TV.

The main living space, with kitchen, dining area, and lounge area
The main living space, with kitchen, dining area, and lounge area

A sliding barn-style door leads to a spacious and generously glazed bedroom, which includes a queen-sized bed with under-bed storage and a small wardrobe. At the other side of the home lies a bathroom, which includes a toilet (standard or composting) and a tub/shower.

A ladder leads to a loft area which can be used as a second bedroom or storage space. The Vintage can also optionally include a second bedroom loft, making a total of three bedrooms in all. While having six people living in a tiny house seems like a recipe for cramped misery, such a setup could be handy in the short term, such as having guests over to stay.

The Vintage weighs roughly 10,000 lb (4,535 kg), depending on options and furniture, and the trailer's two axles are rated to 7,000 lb (3,175 kg) each. Insulation is closed cell foam with a rated R-value of 7.4 per inch, and Escape says that the average R-values for the walls, floor, and ceiling are R22, R30, and R40, respectively.

Pricing starts at US$59,800 and a full off-grid package is available as an option. This includes a roof-mounted solar array, battery storage, and a composting toilet. There's also a whole host of other options, including TV, drywall, and different materials.

Source: Escape Vintage

2 comments
Milton Findley
No thanks, for less than half that amount you can get a camper with slide outs, a bigger living area, and it is towable anywhere. This is not practical at all.
voluntaryist
I like the off grid option. I would want super insulation , e.g., 30, 40, 60. Why not? It's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.