Outdoors

Hillstrike is made to be your hills trike

The Hillstrike takes on the slopes
The Hillstrike takes on the slopes
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Unlike some similar products, the Hillstrike has pedals
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Unlike some similar products, the Hillstrike has pedals
The Hillstrike's tilting rear end in action
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The Hillstrike's tilting rear end in action
The Hillstrike reportedly has a center of gravity similar to that of downhill mountain bikes
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The Hillstrike reportedly has a center of gravity similar to that of downhill mountain bikes
The Hillstrike gets some air
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The Hillstrike gets some air
The Hillstrike weighs 15 kg (33 lb)
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The Hillstrike weighs 15 kg (33 lb)
The Hillstrike has a welded aluminum frame
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The Hillstrike has a welded aluminum frame
While the Hillstrike's pedals don't actually turn, elastomer inserts do let them move back and forth by a few degrees, allowing riders to shift their weight more effectively
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While the Hillstrike's pedals don't actually turn, elastomer inserts do let them move back and forth by a few degrees, allowing riders to shift their weight more effectively
The Hillstrike's skis are custom-designed
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The Hillstrike's skis are custom-designed
The Hillstrike's handlebars
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The Hillstrike's handlebars
Unlike some of its competitors, the Hillstrike has a seat
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Unlike some of its competitors, the Hillstrike has a seat
The Hillstrike features a Rock Shox 120-mm front suspension
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The Hillstrike features a Rock Shox 120-mm front suspension
The Hillstrike's parallelogram system allows the rear end to carve into turns
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The Hillstrike's parallelogram system allows the rear end to carve into turns
The Hillstrike's safety leash keeps it from getting away from riders
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The Hillstrike's safety leash keeps it from getting away from riders
The Hillstrike takes on the slopes
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The Hillstrike takes on the slopes

If you're a downhill mountain biker who lives in a cold-winter climate, chances are that you switch to snowboarding or downhill skiing once the snow sets in. Matic Hriba and a group of fellow Slovenian cyclists, however, really liked the idea of sticking with the handlebars/seat/pedals format. The result is the Hillstrike.

First of all, yes, you're right – there are already some similar products, such as the Snogo and Skki. According to Hillstrike co-founder Rok Prašnikar, however, his team's creation has some unique features.

"We wanted to come as close as possible to the feeling you get while riding a downhill mountain bike on the slopes," he tells us. "That's why our geometry is fully unique and by our assessment makes the optimal ride. The difference on our product is also the pedal system that is positioned where the crankset on mountain bikes usually is. That makes the center of gravity of our product similar to the center of gravity that mountain bikes have."

The Hillstrike's tilting rear end in action
The Hillstrike's tilting rear end in action

While those pedals don't actually turn, elastomer inserts do let them move back and forth by a few degrees, allowing riders to shift their weight more effectively. Additionally, unlike some of its competitors, the Hillstrike has a seat – although it likely won't see much use while riders are careening downhill.

Some of its other features include a safety leash, a Rock Shox 120-mm front suspension, and a parallelogram system that allows the rear end to carve into turns. The whole trike (or whatever you want to call it) weighs 15 kg (33 lb).

The Hillstrike is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, where a pledge of US$1,790 will get you one if all goes according to plans. The estimated retail price is $2,690.

It can be seen in action, in the following video.

Sources: Hillstrike, Kickstarter

HILLSTRIKE SNOWTRIKE PROMO

4 comments
AussieJohn
Too expensive for what it is....
ljaques
It looks quite a lot like the water ski device I used in Arkansas when I was ten. (_That_ cost just $25.) http://watersportindustries.com/images/Ski_seat_guy_thumbs_ups.jpg Where do these people get their pricing models from, NASA? Or do they think "Let's see, the season at Jackson Hole will cost me around 3 grand. Yeah, I'll price it there and go skiing free." <thud>
D[]
I rode something very similar in the early 80's. While this seems a little more manageable I doubt it is too different. They are fun to look at and ride, once. After that they are a pain to haul up and and down a hill. During crashes the handlebars dig horrific trenches into any packed run. Uncontrolled riders are a huge hazard as there is no easy way to go down.
Righteous Indignation
My father built one for me in the 70's.