Automotive

Hyundai Ioniq to offer choice of electrified powertrain

Hyundai Ioniq to offer choice ...
The goal of the IONIQ is to, for the first time, offer a fuel-efficient vehicle to suit any lifestyle, says Hyundai
The goal of the IONIQ is to, for the first time, offer a fuel-efficient vehicle to suit any lifestyle, says Hyundai
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The goal of the IONIQ is to, for the first time, offer a fuel-efficient vehicle to suit any lifestyle, says Hyundai
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The goal of the IONIQ is to, for the first time, offer a fuel-efficient vehicle to suit any lifestyle, says Hyundai
The “Q” is used in the vehicle’s logo as a way to visually set it apart from others
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The “Q” is used in the vehicle’s logo as a way to visually set it apart from others

Hyundai has issued a teaser for an upcoming production model set to debut in 2016, that will be three cars in one build. The Ioinq will be available with a choice of one of three electrified powertrains: a battery-electric, a plug-in gasoline-electric hybrid, or a gasoline-electric hybrid.

Although it can lay claim to the first mass-produced fuel cellvehicle (FCV) in the Tucson Fuel Cell, the Ioniq will be Hyundai's first battery-electric vehicle. It will also be the first vehicle by any manufacturer to be offered with a choice of three electrified powertrains. Hyundai says the idea behind this is to offer a fuel-efficient vehicle to suit any lifestyle.

The Ioniq takes its name from "ion," the basis of electrical operation, and "unique," with Hyundai saying all the models will feature high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. The fully electric (EV) and plug-in hybrid (PHEV) versions can be be charged from the grid, while the hybrid (HEV) model's onboard battery will be charged by the car's gasoline engine and the motion of the car.

Otherwise, details for the new Hyundai are currently scant. Hyundai plans to unveil the car in January in its home country of Korea, before taking it to the Geneva International Motor Show followed by a North American debut at the New York Auto Show in March 2016.

Source: Hyundai

Hyundai has issued a teaser for an upcoming production model set to debut in 2016, that will be three cars in one build. The Ioinq will be available with a choice of one of three electrified powertrains: a battery-electric, a plug-in gasoline-electric hybrid, or a gasoline-electric hybrid.

Although it can lay claim to the first mass-produced fuel cellvehicle (FCV) in the Tucson Fuel Cell, the Ioniq will be Hyundai's first battery-electric vehicle. It will also be the first vehicle by any manufacturer to be offered with a choice of three electrified powertrains. Hyundai says the idea behind this is to offer a fuel-efficient vehicle to suit any lifestyle.

The Ioniq takes its name from "ion," the basis of electrical operation, and "unique," with Hyundai saying all the models will feature high-capacity lithium-ion batteries. The fully electric (EV) and plug-in hybrid (PHEV) versions can be be charged from the grid, while the hybrid (HEV) model's onboard battery will be charged by the car's gasoline engine and the motion of the car.

Otherwise, details for the new Hyundai are currently scant. Hyundai plans to unveil the car in January in its home country of Korea, before taking it to the Geneva International Motor Show followed by a North American debut at the New York Auto Show in March 2016.

Source: Hyundai

4 comments
Tom Lee Mullins
It would be nice if they had a hydrogen fuel cell / battery hybrid. They do have a fuel cell (linked to in the article above).
Paul Anthony
I would like to have a plug in gas version, however rather than gasoline, I can use natural gas that is already plumbed to my house and relatively inexpensive. No more trips to the gas station and long range plus clean burning 🔥 natural gas.
Big Mook
Natural gas just makes sense: Cheap, clean burning, abundant and, as @paulanthony said, already connected to the house. Why more vehicles aren't configured to use it is a mystery to me. It would be as safe as hydrogen in my mind; both extremely explosive, but also, easy to make safe to use with the right tools and delivery mechanisms.
RobMahrt
Only problem with your natural gas request is the current vehicles that operate on natural gas require Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), I do not think many people if anyone has the ability to create CNG on site at their home, I believe it takes a specialized process.