Motorcycles

Norton reveals plans for a 185-horsepower, 1,200cc V4 cafe racer

Norton reveals plans for a 185...
Norton has revealed a prototype version of a full-fat cafe racer sibling to its V4 superbike
Norton has revealed a prototype version of a full-fat cafe racer sibling to its V4 superbike
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Norton has revealed a prototype version of a full-fat cafe racer sibling to its V4 superbike
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Norton has revealed a prototype version of a full-fat cafe racer sibling to its V4 superbike
From the looks of the prototype, differences from the superbike will be minimal
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From the looks of the prototype, differences from the superbike will be minimal
Slim and purposeful
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Slim and purposeful
A 185-horsepower monster like this will get you to the cafe on time
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A 185-horsepower monster like this will get you to the cafe on time
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The messy rebirth of Norton Motorcycles seems back on track under the company's new ownership, India's TVS, and the V4SV superbike is now ready to get its pants off. The V4CR cafe racer stands ready to join the super-naked class as a street weapon.

With a new 73,000-sq-ft (6,782-sq-m) production facility in the West Midlands, TVS is preparing to put some serious volume through Norton in the coming years, milking the storied history of the brand much as Mahindra is planning to do with BSA. To do so, it's going to expand the catalog, beginning with a lightly retro streetbike unveiled today in prototype form.

Based on the V4SV, the V4CR gets a full-fat, unmolested copy of the superbike's 185-horsepower, 1,200cc, 72-degree V4 engine. That claimed 185 ponies will likely put it roughly on par with Triumph's Speed Triple 1200, Aprilia's Tuono V4 1100 and KTM's 1290 Superduke R – a trio of road warriors delivering wonderfully excessive shunt and wild riding experiences for the brave and the foolish.

From the looks of the prototype, differences from the superbike will be minimal
From the looks of the prototype, differences from the superbike will be minimal

The design team has pulled off the front and side fairings, fitting a tiny, round LED headlight instead. V4 engines don't tend to be all that great to look at, so Norton's replaced them with a bellypan and some small side covers, which quietly hide away everything but the alternator and clutch covers. Not the nakedest of nakeds, then, but that's hardly new and it's probably not a bad decision.

The riding position looks like it'll be virtually identical to the sportsbike, with the frame, small solo seat unit, clip-on bars and pegs appearing unchanged. Likewise, the wheels, the exhaust, the Ohlins suspension and Brembo brakes look identical. The subframe and tail are a tad shorter, but not so you'd really notice.

As a prototype, it remains blissfully free of mirrors, indicators, license plates and silly orange reflectors, so you'll have to imagine those in until we see a production model. All in all, it's very much a chopped superbike, for better or worse, and Norton says it'll be available in black or silver when it drops.

Source: Norton Motorcycles

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3 comments
3 comments
LiamKoot
Thats a good looking bike! I would not say no to one of those.
sally
Nice, though would love to see their bikes back with the Rotary Motors especially if based on that designed by its former designer in his limited edition bike shown on here recently.
Kevin Ritchey
It’s all good and fine to show your design and construction expertise in prototypes but does that help to improve the bottom line of your fledgling business that’s teetering on solvency? Build something that the public will clamor for!