Motorcycles

OX Patagonia promises affordable electric adventure motorcycling

OX Patagonia promises affordab...
The Ox Patagonia: electric "adventure" motorcycling focused on affordable practicality
The Ox Patagonia: electric "adventure" motorcycling focused on affordable practicality
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The Ox Patagonia: electric "adventure" motorcycling focused on affordable practicality
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The Ox Patagonia: electric "adventure" motorcycling focused on affordable practicality
Upgrades over the Ox One include crash bars, bash plate, small screen and small leather saddlebags, as well as longer-travel suspension, a bigger front wheel and chunky dual-sport tires
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Upgrades over the Ox One include crash bars, bash plate, small screen and small leather saddlebags, as well as longer-travel suspension, a bigger front wheel and chunky dual-sport tires
Hub motor delivers a peak of 11 kW, continuous power of 6 kW, and a peak torque of 50 Nm
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Hub motor delivers a peak of 11 kW, continuous power of 6 kW, and a peak torque of 50 Nm
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Electric motorcycles tend to be either extremely capable and unforgivably expensive, or affordable and really closer to scooter territory. The Ox Patagonia, coming out of Madrid, aims to find an attractive middle ground: a usable electric adventure experience for less than US$7200.

It's built on the Spanish company's first model, the Ox One cafe racer, and shares most of that $5,400 bike's performance platform. The 11-kW peak, 6-kW nominal (15-hp peak, 8-hp continuous), 50-Nm (37-lb-ft) hub motor, a fairly sedate unit on paper that allows a highway-friendly 110 km/h (68 mph) top speed. The removable battery pack, which weighs 22 kg (48.5 lb) and promises a 100-km (62-mile) range – although that doesn't seem to be a WLTP tested figure, so who knows?

We're unsure of the battery capacity, too; Ox lists the pack as 72 V, 60 A. If that's supposed to be Ah, then the pack holds 4.32 kWh, which seems roughly in the ballpark for the quoted range. Either way, it's either odd for an EV company to make that mistake, or odd for them to quote current rather than capacity.

Also from the Ox One come the double-cradle frame and flat bench seat for two, the digital dash and the small storage compartment under the "tank," complete with USB charger. Likewise the "Elisa" system, which gives the bike GPS navigation, a bunch of performance stats, phone app functionality and the ability to jiggle its handlebars when traffic is close by, as a kind of blind spot warning.

Upgrades over the Ox One include crash bars, bash plate, small screen and small leather saddlebags, as well as longer-travel suspension, a bigger front wheel and chunky dual-sport tires
Upgrades over the Ox One include crash bars, bash plate, small screen and small leather saddlebags, as well as longer-travel suspension, a bigger front wheel and chunky dual-sport tires

Where the One weighs in at just 150 kg (331 lb), though, the Patagonia gains some 10 kg (22 lb). It gets 50 mm (2 in) taller thanks to longer-travel suspension and a 19-inch spoked front rim. It gets a dinky little screen around the LED headlight, a dinky little bashplate, a dinky set of 14-liter leather saddlebags and some crash bars on the sides of the "tank," that ... well, they look a tad on the dinky side.

The Patagonia also gets its own set of apparently Ox-branded chunky dual sport tires to complete the ADV look and inspire misty-eyed daydreams about epic Congo-conquering cross-continental escapades. Now look, nobody's going to get much serious adventuring done on a bike with a 100-km range and a five-hour wall socket charge time, with no fast-charge capability.

Hub motor delivers a peak of 11 kW, continuous power of 6 kW, and a peak torque of 50 Nm
Hub motor delivers a peak of 11 kW, continuous power of 6 kW, and a peak torque of 50 Nm

If you live close to some trails, you might get this thing around a few of them on its bargain-bin dual-shock suspension before the battery calls time. Really, of course, this is an adventure bike in the same sense that most SUVs are four-wheel-drives: it kinda looks the part, but it's really most likely to get used helping people attempt to look windswept and interesting as they commute to work.

At €6,900 (US$7,190), though, perhaps there's a niche for it. There's no doubt in my mind that the Zero FX, for example, is a better performer, but that starts at $9,795 with a (probably) smaller battery and a shorter range. Ox is doing everything it can to keep its bikes accessible, and that's a good thing. Still, Patagonia deliveries won't start until September, and it doesn't seem Ox has started delivering the One yet. So it's probably worth waiting to see what this thing looks like in the real world before you slap any cash down.

Source: Ox Motorcycles

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4 comments
4 comments
TedTheJackal
I just want to process how much I don't like faux gas tanks on electric motorcycles and faux front grills on electric cars. They're stupid. Get over it. It's like putting horse tails on the first cars.
DavidB
At last, an electric motorcycle that looks like a motorcycle, without the stupid ducktail fender+seat and hunched-over riding position.

I’ll keep an eye out for these and hope for better range on subsequent model years.
geemy
so does metacycle is more power, quicker, lighter and cheaper. no faux tank but a hole in the frame that can be used for additional battery, charger, or a "tunk" tank-trunk.
got a $deposit on one before they raised the price.
ljaques
The Zero FX 3.6 (smaller battery) has a 27hp motor while the FX 7.2 gives you 47hp. BIG difference, and the Zero FX looks nice.