Architecture

Concrete micro house is a pipe dream

Concrete micro house is a pipe...
The OPod Tube House comprises a total floorspace of 100 sq ft (9.29 sq m)
The OPod Tube House comprises a total floorspace of 100 sq ft (9.29 sq m)
View 10 Images
The OPod Tube House comprises a total floorspace of 100 sq ft (9.29 sq m)
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The OPod Tube House comprises a total floorspace of 100 sq ft (9.29 sq m)
The OPod Tube House measures just 2.5 m (8.2 ft) in diameter
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The OPod Tube House measures just 2.5 m (8.2 ft) in diameter
The OPod Tube House is designed by James Law Cybertecture
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The OPod Tube House is designed by James Law Cybertecture
The picture above shows the OPod Tube House's living area, which includes space-saving furniture, including a sofa/bed, shelving and storage space
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The picture above shows the OPod Tube House's living area, which includes space-saving furniture, including a sofa/bed, shelving and storage space
The OPod Tube House comprises a total floorspace of 100 sq ft (9.29 sq m)
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The OPod Tube House comprises a total floorspace of 100 sq ft (9.29 sq m)
James Law Cybertecture envisions the OPod Tube House being installed in urban infill areas unsuitable for typical buildings
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James Law Cybertecture envisions the OPod Tube House being installed in urban infill areas unsuitable for typical buildings
Multiple OPod Tube House units could be stacked atop each other
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Multiple OPod Tube House units could be stacked atop each other
The OPod Tube House is designed by James Law Cybertecture
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The OPod Tube House is designed by James Law Cybertecture
The OPod Tube House was designed to mitigate Hong Kong's notorious low-cost housing issues
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The OPod Tube House was designed to mitigate Hong Kong's notorious low-cost housing issues
The OPod Tube House includes an apartment-style layout suitable for one or two people
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The OPod Tube House includes an apartment-style layout suitable for one or two people
View gallery - 10 images

Here's one of the more unusual housing ideas we've come across in a while. The OPod Tube House, by James Law Cybertecture, is a micro house made from concrete water piping that measures just 2.5 m (8.2 ft) in diameter. Its snug interior features an apartment-style layout suitable for one or two people.

Resembling Mexico's Tubohotel, which we covered back in 2011, the OPod was designed with a view to mitigating Hong Kong's housing shortages, which have given rise to the area's infamous "coffin cubicles."

Access is gained by a glazed door and inside it comprises a total floorspace of just 100 sq ft (9.29 sq m). The photo above shows the living area, which includes a sofa bed, shelving, and storage space. A second section of concrete pipe is connected at the rear to provide a kitchenette and small bathroom with shower and toilet.

James Law Cybertecture envisions the OPod being installed in urban areas unsuitable for standard construction, such as narrow alleyways between buildings, for example. Multiple units could be stacked atop each other, with simple metal stairways providing access. The firm has made some mockups showing how such a development may take shape.

Multiple OPod Tube House units could be stacked atop each other
Multiple OPod Tube House units could be stacked atop each other

The South China Morning Post reports that each OPod will cost around US$15,000 (not including the cost of land, presumably) and be used to house people temporarily while they await larger longterm accommodation.

The project appears to still be the prototype stage with no immediate plans to build, but we've reached out to the firm for confirmation.

Source: James Law Cybertecture

View gallery - 10 images
11 comments
aki009
If you put them 100 feet underground they will nicely double as underground shelters for when the zombie apocalypse hits.
Bob
How is the tube heated and cooled? Living without vertical and horizontal walls, ceilings and floors can be very disorienting. The acoustics are probably lousy. Looks totally miserable to me.
Tom Lee Mullins
I think it is a neat room but I don't consider it a house.
VincentWolf
Bury them underground to make good bomb shelters--Japan will need them soon which NK is getting ready for WWIII.
snowflake0446
Is anyone else seeing "prison cell" with modified furniture, etc?
Nik
Like -snowflake0446- my thoughts were 'prison cell,' why would anyone choose to live in one? Maybe if you were homeless, then one of these would be better than the street, as long as you were not claustrophobic, or dont mind living in a virtual fish tank.
Brian M
Not the mot efficient use of space , a square shape would be more efficient and liveable from a users point of view. But great for ex-submariners!
Fretting Freddy the Ferret pressing the Fret
Well, if you have some concrete water pipes laying around might as well...
icykel
Could be combined with a larger cylindrical water tank type structure to add volume. A very easy shape to manufacture and very strong. I have lived in small boats over a number of years and found no problem with the tunnel shape.
DaleBarclay
The hexagon, 6 sided, is the most efficient shape for construction of this type. The space between the tubes as shown could be used for wiring and utility access.