Tiny Houses

Flatpack Surf Shack can be configured to suit your needs

The Surf Shack is delivered in flatpack form by truck (or helicopter if it's a very rural spot)
The Surf Shack is delivered in flatpack form by truck (or helicopter if it's a very rural spot)
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The Surf Shack is available for order now and takes around two months to build and deliver
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The Surf Shack is available for order now and takes around two months to build and deliver
The Surf Shack is delivered in flatpack form by truck (or helicopter if it's a very rural spot)
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The Surf Shack is delivered in flatpack form by truck (or helicopter if it's a very rural spot)
The Surf Shack is modular, so can grow in size, but floorspace starts at 191 sq ft (17.7 sq m)
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The Surf Shack is modular, so can grow in size, but floorspace starts at 191 sq ft (17.7 sq m)
The interior of the Surf Shack includes a bedroom upstairs, living room, dining area, kitchenette and bathroom
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The interior of the Surf Shack includes a bedroom upstairs, living room, dining area, kitchenette and bathroom

Backcountry Hut Company (BHC), the Canadian firm that offers flatpack cabins that assemble "like Ikea furniture," has unveiled a new model called the Surf Shack. The attractive little dwelling comes in multiple configurations and sizes, and can operate on or off-the-grid.

The Surf Shack can be purchased in larger sizes, but the base model offers a total floorspace of 191 sq ft (17.7 sq m). Rather than a full-time home, it seems better suited as a vacation home or weekend cabin.

The example pictured has an open interior layout with generous glazing. Its interior includes a living room, dining area, kitchenette and bathroom, with a wood-burning stove offering heat and a porch either side providing some outdoor space. Stairs lead to a single bedroom.

However, as is usually the case with prefabricated homes, the Surf Shack is very customizable. BHC discusses potential clients' needs and builds the dwelling to suit their lifestyle, so additional bedrooms or a larger kitchen could be added, for example.

The Surf Shack is modular, so can grow in size, but floorspace starts at 191 sq ft (17.7 sq m)
The Surf Shack is modular, so can grow in size, but floorspace starts at 191 sq ft (17.7 sq m)

The Surf Shack is delivered in flatpack form by truck (or helicopter if it's a very rural spot). Assembly is promised to be easy, and doesn't require heavy machinery. Indeed, BHC told us that assuming all regulations are met, four handy people with some basic building skills should be able to assemble a Surf Shack within a week.

The cabins can run on or off-the-grid. We've no details on any of the off-grid tech available ,but BHC says it provides systems to match clients requirements, so composting toilet and solar panels are probably a safe bet.

The Surf Shack is available for order now in the US and Canada, with further availability planned for the future. BHC told us that each model is custom fabricated and takes around two months to build and deliver. The most basic shell the firm offers starts at CAN$55,000 (roughly US$45,000), with the final price rising depending on options chosen.

Source: Backcountry Hut Company

3 comments
BlueOak
"...as is usually the case with prefabricated homes, the Surf Shack is very customizable." Care to back that statement up? Isn't the opposite true - that prefab homes tend to be very standardized?
EH
Very nice, clean design, though over $250/sq. ft. for a "hut" seems higher than it could be. It would be nice to see more information on the insulation, power and plumbing arrangements, if any.
ljaques
A 10x20ish-foot wood shack for "just" $45k or more? It'll be nice when the Tiny Home fad wears off and prices plummet to fairly decent rates. Until then, they're 4x what they should be. BlueOak, "prefab" means "made in the factory" rather than on-site. Yes, they standardize the walls/floor/roof, but you can tell them where to put what size windows and doors, lofts, what side to put the bath/kitchen, and such. (At least at some tiny home builders do, dunno 'bout here.) I've never figured out why all tiny homes aren't built with SIPs for the quiet and comfort. <shrug>