Bike Racks

  • ​If you run a bike-share co-op that extolls the virtues of a car-free lifestyle, then you might feel like a bit of a hypocrite on the odd occasion that you have to use a car or truck to transport multiple bikes. Well, the Exozox is here to help, as it lets you tow a couple of bikes behind your own.
  • ​We've seen suction-cup car-top bicycle carriers before, although you've gotta wonder if users would constantly be worrying about them coming unstuck. Albike's Wox offers a solution, in that it incorporates a motorized vacuum pump, and it wirelessly notifies users if the seal breaks.
  • ​Rear racks and panniers are handy for carrying stuff on bikes, although so are frame-mounted cargo boxes. Otek Bicycles' sleek aluminum/ABS Aerocarrier combines a box with a rack, that can also accept third-party panniers.
  • Simpler and more affordable than a camper van or trailer, the Roofnest Sandpiper is a viable alternative, turning an Outback or 4Runner into a gear-hauling mini-RV. A roof-top tent with factory-mounted roof rails, the Sandpiper offers flexibility in carrying shelter and gear deep into the wild.
  • ​When it comes to transporting mountain bikes in pickup trucks, many people choose to place the bikes with their front wheels hanging over the tailgate. The just-released Latchit Rack takes this idea and runs with it, reportedly allowing for both more secure and more efficient transit.
  • Attempting to solve several bike rack issues all at once, Seattle's Stag Rack presents a versatile, multi-sport rack designed to mount on any vehicle in about two minutes. The system relies on vacuum cups and interchangeable mounts to easily switch between carrying bikes or skis.
  • In 2016, Australian entrepreneurs Stefan Wrobel and Sean Stoney headed to Kickstarter with a device known as the Upside Rack, which allows cyclists to carry a wide variety of bicycles upside down on their car's roof rack. It's now in production, and we had a chance to put it to the test.
  • Not every cyclist can stow away their bikes in a garage. Apartment dwellers don't have much space indoors, but won't want to leave their bikes outside either. Italy's Vadolibero has combined a vertical bike rack with a floor lamp for a stylish solution to cycle storage in the home.
  • ​Bicycle locks can be a hassle to cart around, which is why we've seen ones that double as part OF the bike, such as its handlebars, seatpost, pedal and saddle. One of the latest, the Nexibi, is a folding lock that also serves as a rear rack.
  • ​Bike racks that mount on your vehicle's trailer hitch may be handy, but they can make it difficult to access the rear hatch. While some such racks do fold down or swing to one side, Saris' new Glide takes a different approach. As its name implies, it "glides" back out of the way.
  • ​​If you own more than one type of bicycle, then you may have noticed that a single car-top-mounting system doesn't necessarily work for all of them. That's why Australian cyclists Stefan Wrobel and Sean Stoney invented the Upside Rack. ​
  • ​Rear racks and panniers may indeed be useful, but they're also one of those things that many self-proclaimed "bike snobs" would never mount on their glorious two-wheeled work of art. So, what's a snob to do if they've got gear to haul? Well, they could always try the Tailfin.