Wound

  • ​Tapping into the machinery of a cell and rewiring it to take on another identity is an exciting capability that scientists are just beginning to explore.​ Now researchers at the Salk Institute report another groundbreaking advance, converting open wounds into healthy skin.
  • ​For centuries, various cultures have used clay as a remedy for infections. Now, scientists from Arizona State University (ASU) and the Mayo Clinic have determined that blue clay in particular may indeed be effective at treating infected wounds.
  • ​Chronic skin ulcers such as those associated with diabetes are notoriously difficult to treat. As a result, we've seen experimental approaches such as spray-on skin, ultrasound band-aids, and silver-laced dressings. Now, scientists are getting very good results using a high-tech lamp.
  • Chronic skin wounds may be notoriously difficult to treat, but at the same time they shouldn't be OVER-treated, subjecting patients to more antibiotics than is necessary. That's why scientists have developed a "smart" bandage that only dispenses medication as needed.
  • ​Because diabetics often have both nerve damage and poor circulation, they will often not notice when they receive skin wounds, which proceed to heal very slowly. Those wounds can thus become chronic. A new regenerative bandage, however, could help keep this from happening.
  • ​Four years ago, we heard how researchers had created a microwave-oven-sized 3D printer that could produce sheets of skin for treating burns. Now, some of the same scientists have developed a handheld device that prints skin directly onto deep wounds.
  • ​One of the problems with antibiotics is the fact that new ones have to constantly be produced, in order to kill resistant strains of bacteria. When it comes to treating infected wounds, however, antibiotics may be getting some help – in the form of microscopic polystyrene beads.
  • A team from Texas A&M University has created a novel injectable bandage that blends a commonly used food thickening agent with nanoparticles. The result is an injectable hydrogel than can rapidly stop bleeding and potentially promote wound healing.
  • ​According to recent studies, surgical site infections (SSIs) are the leading cause of hospital readmission following an operation. In hopes of catching those SSIs before readmission is necessary, scientists have developed an experimental app known as WoundCare.
  • ​One of the problems with bacteria is the fact that they can't be seen with the naked eye – this can be particularly problematic for physicians who are checking wounds for infection. That's why the MolecuLight i:X was created. The device allows doctors to see where bacteria are present in real time.
  • ​New research has found that stem cells residing in the skin can learn from earlier inflammatory episodes and heal faster when subsequently​ injured. This insight could have significant implications into how we understand a range of inflammatory disorders.
  • ​​Advanced surgical glues that seal wounds faster could mean big things when it comes to medical care. A new material is showing particular promise in this regard, with the ability to be squirted directly into a wound, seal it in 60 seconds and dissolve thereafter. ​