Tiny Houses

3D-printed concrete Fibonacci House built by the numbers

3D-printed concrete Fibonacci ...
As its name suggests, the Fibonacci House was inspired by the Fibonacci number sequence
As its name suggests, the Fibonacci House was inspired by the Fibonacci number sequence
View 11 Images
As its name suggests, the Fibonacci House was inspired by the Fibonacci number sequence
1/11
As its name suggests, the Fibonacci House was inspired by the Fibonacci number sequence
The Fibonacci House has a bathroom with shower, sink, and toilet
2/11
The Fibonacci House has a bathroom with shower, sink, and toilet
The Fibonacci House features generous glazing, helping fill the interior with daylight
3/11
The Fibonacci House features generous glazing, helping fill the interior with daylight
The Fibonacci House is located in the Kootenay Lake Village community at Procter, British Columbia, Canada
4/11
The Fibonacci House is located in the Kootenay Lake Village community at Procter, British Columbia, Canada
The Fibonacci House measures just 35 sq m (376 sq ft) and has a simple, utilitarian interior decor
5/11
The Fibonacci House measures just 35 sq m (376 sq ft) and has a simple, utilitarian interior decor
The Fibonacci House's 3D-printed sections were joined together on site using a crane
6/11
The Fibonacci House's 3D-printed sections were joined together on site using a crane
Though a 3D printer created its walls, Fibonacci House's roof was installed by humans
7/11
Though a 3D printer created its walls, Fibonacci House's roof was installed by humans
The Fibonacci House includes a covered porch area with some seating
8/11
The Fibonacci House includes a covered porch area with some seating
The Fibonacci House's individual sections were printed in layers
9/11
The Fibonacci House's individual sections were printed in layers
The Fibonacci House's sections took a total of 11 days to print, though additional time was then spent assembling it
10/11
The Fibonacci House's sections took a total of 11 days to print, though additional time was then spent assembling it
The Fibonacci House rests on a concrete foundation
11/11
The Fibonacci House rests on a concrete foundation
View gallery - 11 images

It has inspired yachts, cars, and countless buildings, and now the Fibonacci number sequence has served as muse to 3D-printing firm Twente Additive Manufacturing (TAM), which has created what it calls Canada's first 3D-printed home. Named the Fibonacci House, it's a non-towable concrete tiny house that sleeps up to two adults and two children, and is available for rent on Airbnb.

'The Fibonacci House was printed using a concrete printer designed and sold by Twente Additive Manufacturing, a construction-technology company,' explains the firm. "The design of the house was created using the Fibonacci Sequence, a well-known pattern that is often referred to as 'the golden ratio' which can be found in nature in numerous variations: in shells, flower petals, leaf formations, etc. The Twente Team was inspired by this ancient pattern that has always intrigued people of science, of art and of nature throughout history immemorial."

The Fibonacci House measures just 35 sq m (376 sq ft) and has a simple, utilitarian interior decor
The Fibonacci House measures just 35 sq m (376 sq ft) and has a simple, utilitarian interior decor

The Fibonacci House brings to mind Apis Cor's tiny house in Russia and is actually a tad smaller than that home at just 35 sq m (376 sq ft). Its interior decor is simple and much of the available space is taken up by a living area with generous glazing that shows off the view of the beautiful Canadian countryside. Nearby are a kitchenette and a bathroom with shower, sink, and toilet. There are two sleeping areas, both up in the mezzanine area of the home and both reached by ladder. There's also a small covered porch area outside with some seating.

The build process was similar to other 3D-printed architecture projects we've reported on. A 3D printer extruded a cement mixture, layer by layer, building up the basic structure of the home in sections over 11 days. Once finished, the sections were then joined together by human builders, with the help of a crane, and then they finished off the home with handmade window frames, a door, roof and furniture, as well as wiring and plumbing, etc.

Though a 3D printer created its walls, Fibonacci House's roof was installed by humans
Though a 3D printer created its walls, Fibonacci House's roof was installed by humans

The Fibonacci House is located in the Kootenay Lake Village community at Procter, British Columbia in Canada, and is available for rent on Airbnb, with profits going to the international home building charity World Housing.

Source: TAM

View gallery - 11 images
5 comments
5 comments
BlueOak
That is a surprisingly uninteresting home given the presumbably near-infinite possibilities.
Don Duncan
"...generous glazing..." = insulation compromised, expensive to heat/cool. But it looked good to the designer (who won't be paying). And that roof? What % of the cost?
I've seen these printed houses done at the site, mostly. What is the extra cost of doing it off-site? What was the cost? How did they use the Fibonacci Sequence? Did the author write this or just re-print from a brochure?
ccguy
I also see no evidence that the Fibonacci Sequence was used in the design. Since the headline touted Fibonacci, it would seem that the content should address Fibonacci. I’d like to see an update of this to include a description of how the Fibonacci Sequence influenced the design.
Catweazle
Not impressed.
Now, if they can manage a Tesseract house...
Jeff7
A good party trick but years away from competing with modern pre-fab. Wouldn’t pass structural / earthquake standards in most countries.