Bicycles

Minimalist "do-it-all" Dutch ebike gets ready to roll

Minimalist "do-it-all" Dutch e...
The Polder cuts a striking minimalist pose thanks to its pressed aluminum frame and clean lines
The Polder cuts a striking minimalist pose thanks to its pressed aluminum frame and clean lines
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The Polder cuts a striking minimalist pose thanks to its pressed aluminum frame and clean lines
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The Polder cuts a striking minimalist pose thanks to its pressed aluminum frame and clean lines
A LED lighting strip has been incorporated into the head tube as a headlight, the Polder rides on 28-inch rims with Vredestian tires and the ebike benefits from a clean, low-maintenance Gates Carbon belt drive
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A LED lighting strip has been incorporated into the head tube as a headlight, the Polder rides on 28-inch rims with Vredestian tires and the ebike benefits from a clean, low-maintenance Gates Carbon belt drive
The lockable compartment up top can accommodate battery packs of different shapes and sizes, to allow for future upgrades as the technology improves
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The lockable compartment up top can accommodate battery packs of different shapes and sizes, to allow for future upgrades as the technology improves
The Polder is built in Amsterdam using 90 percent European-sourced parts
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The Polder is built in Amsterdam using 90 percent European-sourced parts
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Mokumono was founded in 2014 by twin brothers Bob and Tom Schiller with a focus on producing ebikes using only European-sourced parts. With the Polder, the design team has almost got there – the new ebike is built in Amsterdam and made up of 90 percent European components.

"Our goal isn’t just to build the best looking and exciting e-bike around, we’re trying to shake up the entire bike industry along the way," said company co-founder Tom Schiller. "We’re showing that you don’t need a factory in Taiwan to build good and affordable e-bikes without making any concessions. We don’t intend to sell you a new bike every two years - we want to see you driving this one as long as possible. That’s actual sustainability."

Like the company's previous models (the Delta S urban mover and Delta C city ride), the Polder allrounder benefits from a smooth-lined pressed aluminum frame that's reported suitable for riders between 1.65 and 1.95 m (5.4 - 6.4 ft) in height.

There's a compartment to the top for the removable battery, which comes in two options – a 360-Wh unit for around 80 km (~50 miles) of per-charge range, or a 540-Wh flavor for up to 120 km (74.5 miles).

This lockable "trunk" has been designed to accommodate battery packs of different shapes and sizes, affording the user a choice to stick with the supplied units or upgrade to better ones as ebike battery technology improves. There's also a nook inside for popping in an Airtag, SmartTag or Tile Mate so users can keep track of the ebike when they're not around, and there might even be enough space in there to stow away a few belongings during the ride too.

The lockable compartment up top can accommodate battery packs of different shapes and sizes, to allow for future upgrades as the technology improves
The lockable compartment up top can accommodate battery packs of different shapes and sizes, to allow for future upgrades as the technology improves

Pedal-assist up to 25 km/h (15.5 mph) and torque of 35 Nm (25.8 lb.ft) comes courtesy of the petite Fazua 250-W rear-hub motor, in line with EU regs, and there's an integrated torque sensor for a more responsive ride. A Gates Carbon belt drive makes for a clean, low-maintenance user experience – though that does come at the expense of the ride flexibility offered by a geared chain drivetrain.

The Polder is paired with a companion mobile app via Bluetooth, and can automatically power on when the authorized rider approaches. The ebike doesn't have a dedicated display but rather uses the smartphone/app combination mounted in the middle of a funky Blade handlebar, with the ebike's battery helping keep the handset topped up along the way.

Other key specs include a total weight of 20 kg (44 lb), frame-integrated LED lighting, the ebike rides on 28-inch rims wrapped in Vredestian Icon tires and stopping power comes from hydraulic disc brakes with 160-mm rotors. Fenders front and back are included, there's a rear cargo rack too, and a built-in kickstand as well.

For European riders, Mokumono will either send its own technicians out for local repairs or arrange to work with mobile bike services in other countries. The company will rely on international dealers for delivery and service of ebikes shipped outside of Europe. Mokumono has also committed to keeping all necessary components in stock for at least 10 years to support its "built to last" ethos.

The Polder is up for pre-order now for an introductory price of €2,590 (about US$2,800), and is available in 40 different colors. Shipping is expected to start in September. The video below has more.

The Mokumono Polder | Built to last.

Product page: Mokumono Polder

View gallery - 4 images
2 comments
2 comments
danBran
Until these e-bikes get into the $1000 to $1500 price range they will never sell in bulk. And designing a new bike with a 250W motor to "meet Euro standards" will have trouble moving inventory in the US
EH
It looks like good engineering, with a competitive price for something that will last. I'd suggest a good gasket on the "trunk" hatch, and some sort of weather protection for the smartphone display. A small built-in LCD to show at least battery charge would be very helpful.