Bicycles

Yamaha hits the road with 28-mph pedal-assist Civante

Yamaha hits the road with 28-m...
At home on city streets, the Civante is Yamaha's first Class 3 ebike
At home on city streets, the Civante is Yamaha's first Class 3 ebike
View 13 Images
The Civante features a 500-Wh lockable and removable battery
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The Civante features a 500-Wh lockable and removable battery
The Civante sports a double chainring and 10-speed derailleur
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The Civante sports a double chainring and 10-speed derailleur
There's a handy switch controller to the left of the handlebar stem
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There's a handy switch controller to the left of the handlebar stem
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The center-mounted PWSeries SE motor provides power assist up to 28 mph
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The center-mounted PWSeries SE motor provides power assist up to 28 mph
The Civante rides on mid-depth aero wheels
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The Civante rides on mid-depth aero wheels
The battery unit housing has a handy status indicator
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The battery unit housing has a handy status indicator
A multi-function LCD display shows speed, assist modes, distance traveled, battery status and more
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A multi-function LCD display shows speed, assist modes, distance traveled, battery status and more
The Civante features a three sensor system that matches the assist level to changing terrain and riding needs
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The Civante features a three sensor system that matches the assist level to changing terrain and riding needs
The Civante offers a stylish pedal-assisted last mile commute
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The Civante offers a stylish pedal-assisted last mile commute
The Civante tips the scales at 43.4 lb
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The Civante tips the scales at 43.4 lb
The frame, motor, battery and other components are all manufactured in-house
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The frame, motor, battery and other components are all manufactured in-house
At home on city streets, the Civante is Yamaha's first Class 3 ebike
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At home on city streets, the Civante is Yamaha's first Class 3 ebike
View gallery - 13 images

Yamaha Bicycles has impressive form in the world of ebikes, having launched the world's first electric power-assisted bike back in 1993. Now the company is launching its first Class 3 category ebike in the shape of the Civante.

"The Civante will introduce a new group of riders to Yamaha’s legendary quality, comfort and performance and increases and diversifies our retail options," said Yamaha's Drew Engelmann. "The Civante looks great, feels smooth and comfortable, and delivers the cutting-edge handling dynamics and seamless integration of assist technology that Yamaha does better than anyone else."

Like other Yamaha rides, the frame, motor, battery unit and other components are all produced in-house. Cabling is routed through the aluminum frame for a clean look, and there are mount holes for fenders, a kickstand and cargo rack.

The Civante rides on mid-depth aero wheels
The Civante rides on mid-depth aero wheels

The Civante is a Class 3 electric power assist ebike, meaning its mid-mount PWSeries SE motor can give you some help on your way up to 28 mph, after which you're on your own. Four power levels are available, and up to 70 Nm (51.6 lb.ft) of torque.

A Triple Sensor System measures pedal torque, bike speed and crank arm cadence to offer more or less assist to match the changing terrain and riding needs. And a lockable "long-lasting" 500-Wh Li-ion battery can be removed for indoor charging, with Yamaha reporting that its high-speed charge will get it from zero to 80 percent capacity in about an hour.

A Bluetooth-enabled, multi-function LCD display at the center of the drop handlebar shows speed, battery range, assist modes and more, and there's a handy control switch to the left of the handlebar stem.

The Civante tips the scales at 43.4 lb
The Civante tips the scales at 43.4 lb

Rounding out the given specs are Shimano STI shifters, a double chainring, 10-speed derailleur, hydraulic disc braking, integrated LED headlight, and 27.5-inch mid-depth aerodynamic wheels wrapped in CST puncture-resistant tires with reflective sidewalls and smooth tread. The ebike appears to ride without suspension in play, but the handlebar has been treated to extra padding covered in cork tape to smooth out some of the vibrations during a ride.

Set to land at dealers from this month, the Civante carries a suggested retail price of US$3,399 – which puts it in a similar price bracket as Triumph's Trekker GT and Gogoro's eye-catching Eeyo 1.

Source: Yamaha Bicycles

View gallery - 13 images
6 comments
alexD
Legendary quality, comfort and performance but, unfortunately, not affordability... looks quite cool clean looks, very nice, I admit.
jerryd
Way too pricey without suspension at those speeds certainly isn't comfortable. The good news is this class is now legal in Florida along with scooters with seats to 20mph.
moreover
Impressed by the 80% in one hour recharge time claim. Wondering if that refers to 100v, 110 or 240v outlets (Japan, which surprises me, only has 100v). I also like that the design 'fesses up' to being an e-bike and does not hide the battery in the frame.
WilliamPratt
This is a big mistake by Yamaha. Very few people buy road E-bikes. Our company sells a couple hundred E-bikes a year and have only sold one with drop style handlebars in 5 years. They are also very late to the market. They join well over 100 other brands of E-bikes.
Daishi
@alexD It depends what you compare the price against. If you buy a brand like Specialized that uses Bosch kits from a bike store they cost $6-7k, Yamaha kits tend to cost less than Bosch. There are definitely more expensive bikes on the market and bikes that are sold in retail tend to cost more because you are getting better support and customer service than stuff you buy direct to consumer online for cheaper. I do tend to agree with @WilliamPratt though, I hate the super skinny bike tires with the annoying french valve stems that have to be kept at like 60 psi and refilled every time you use the bicycle. People only put up with it because they are supper efficient and with only human power that efficiency is really important but once you add electric assist why bother? I'll take slightly bigger tires and a schrader valve please.
Nobody
Every one I know that bought an electric bike quit using them after a few months. Remembering to charge them and diminishing range after a few charges sours the owners rather quickly. When the batteries die, it is like peddling a hundred pound bike with two flat tires.