Tiny Houses

Vista tiny house lowers price, increases view

Vista tiny house lowers price,...
The Vista tiny house will set you back US$39,900
The Vista tiny house will set you back US$39,900
View 23 Images
The tiny house weighs in at roughly 6,000 lb (2,721 kg) and sits on a trailer for easy towing
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The tiny house weighs in at roughly 6,000 lb (2,721 kg) and sits on a trailer for easy towing
The tiny home is clad in clear cedar siding and trim, with steel accent and protective panels
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The tiny home is clad in clear cedar siding and trim, with steel accent and protective panels
The Vista tiny house will set you back US$39,900
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The Vista tiny house will set you back US$39,900
The Vista can be outfitted to operate off-grid
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The Vista can be outfitted to operate off-grid
Inside the Vista, floorspace is split between a kitchen and main living area, bathroom and bedroom area
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Inside the Vista, floorspace is split between a kitchen and main living area, bathroom and bedroom area
Shot of the kitchen area
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Shot of the kitchen area
The glazing is very generous, which should help mitigate the claustrophobia of living in such a snug space
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The glazing is very generous, which should help mitigate the claustrophobia of living in such a snug space
The kitchen units are generously proportioned
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The kitchen units are generously proportioned
There are plenty of storage areas, including under-bed storage, cupboards, and small nooks
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There are plenty of storage areas, including under-bed storage, cupboards, and small nooks
The kitchen is outfitted with fridge, sink, and optional induction cooktop
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The kitchen is outfitted with fridge, sink, and optional induction cooktop
There are plenty of storage areas, including under-bed storage, cupboards, and small nooks
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There are plenty of storage areas, including under-bed storage, cupboards, and small nooks
The bedroom area/day bed
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The bedroom area/day bed
A pop-up flatscreen TV comes as an option
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A pop-up flatscreen TV comes as an option
Under-bed storage
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Under-bed storage
The windows are energy-efficient Low-E windows, most of which are operable
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The windows are energy-efficient Low-E windows, most of which are operable
A small dining area
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A small dining area
View toward the bathroom door
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View toward the bathroom door
The kitchen cupboard
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The kitchen cupboard
Lighting comes in the form of LED lights
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Lighting comes in the form of LED lights
Escape's optional solar package comprises a 500 W roof-based array and battery storage and inverter
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Escape's optional solar package comprises a 500 W roof-based array and battery storage and inverter
The Vista will currently set you back US$39,900, though that's an introductory price which will eventually rise to $46,600
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The Vista will currently set you back US$39,900, though that's an introductory price which will eventually rise to $46,600
The tiny home is clad in handsome clear cedar siding
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The tiny home is clad in handsome clear cedar siding
The tiny home weighs in at roughly 6,000 lb (2,721 kg)
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The tiny home weighs in at roughly 6,000 lb (2,721 kg)

Escape has made a name for itself in the tiny house community with its Park Model RV and Traveler tiny homes, which offer an excellent finish and well thought-out features. Its latest model, the Vista, promises the same craftsmanship but at a lower price, and features optional off-grid technology, very generous glazing, and a space-saving layout.

The Vista measures 20 x 8.5 x 9.6 ft (6.1 x 2.6 x 2.9 m) and rests on a trailer for easy towing, with total weight of roughly 6,000 lb (2,720 kg). The interior comprises a total floorspace of 160 sq ft (14.8 sq m), so it's significantly smaller than Escape's previous offerings, but nowhere near the smallest tiny house we've seen.

The exterior is clad in clear cedar siding and metal trim. Access is gained via a glass door, and the windows are energy-efficient Low-E windows – which is important, as the Vista sports about as much glazing as one could reasonably want from a tiny house, hence its name (obscured glass is also available for the privacy-conscious).

The Vista's interior is all on one level and split between a kitchen, dining and living area, bathroom, and bedroom area. The available photos show what appears to be a well-proportioned interior and the glazing should help make the small space feel less cramped.

Shot of the kitchen area
Shot of the kitchen area

Storage space – the achilles heel of any tiny house – includes under-bed storage, large cabinets, shelving and handy little nooks. Amenities include a shower and composting toilet in the bathroom, sink and counter in the kitchen, and an optional pop-up flatscreen TV in the bedroom area.

The interior walls are clad in aspen and the floor decked in oak laminate. Insulation comes in the form of closed cell foam, and air-conditioning is available, too – though as usual with these tiny house packages, pretty much every feature can be upgraded to suit, providing you're willing to pay. Indeed, the Vista can also be outfitted with off-grid technology, including a roof-based PV array, battery storage, and inverter.

The Vista will set you back US$39,900, though that's an introductory price for its basic package of amenities and will eventually rise to $46,600.

Source: Escape

7 comments
Righteous Indignation
Tiny houses with huge price tags. Buy two sheds at your favorite home improvement chain for under $2K and build your own tiny house for a fraction of the cost. Who are these people trying to fool?
Stein-Erik Dahle
This is a very nice little house! But with these big windows it'll be very hard to keep warm in the winter!
Wolf0579
It wasn't that long ago, when $40K would buy you a 3 bedroom home in a nice residential area.
ljaques
Interesting. R-38 ceiling and floor, but R-3 walls. But $40k _without_ PV/Batt/Inverter? C'mon, guys. Given the look, we're not paying for style here. And PV is the only way it makes sense, since it probably wastes heat/coolth like mad.
Walt Stawicki
this is a HOUSE TRAILER pretending to be of the tinyhome category. Wheels, hitch...all the accoutrements of zoning headaches!!! and constructionwise a step backwards to higher maintenance. would YOU want to be the mover? don't think so!
Don Duncan
$40K is the downpayment. This trailer is a maintenance nightmare, e.g., cedar siding. And the energy needed to keep comfortable in this birdcage would be expensive to provide unless in a semi-tropical setting with ideal round the year temps. Maybe someone in Hawaii could justify this design, if they lived in the mountains.
Calson
If it can be putting in a cargo container and safely transported to a destination by ship or by train or by truck it would be an incredible living structure. In many remote areas it is impossible to find skilled carpenters, plumbers, electricians, and other building tradespeople, and equally difficult to find the materials needed including all the plumbing and electrical bits and bobs. Trucking this to a piece of land well off the grid or to a place like Fuji or Costa Rica and having a mini-home in a day's time would be a boon to many people.