Marine

Sinot's hydrogen-powered Aqua superyacht concept takes "green" opulence to new heights

Sinot's hydrogen-powered Aqua ...
Sinot's hydrogen-powered Aqua superyacht is an extraordinary design
Sinot's hydrogen-powered Aqua superyacht is an extraordinary design
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The "bow observatory" lets you re-live that Titanic moment from a sun lounge
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The "bow observatory" lets you re-live that Titanic moment from a sun lounge
The "bow observatory"
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The "bow observatory"
The chairs in this main lounge rotate around on a track to set up a theater or conversation space
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The chairs in this main lounge rotate around on a track to set up a theater or conversation space
The rear upper deck
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The rear upper deck
The Aqua's outdoor lounge
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The Aqua's outdoor lounge
Follow the spiral staircase down to the bottom level to see the Aqua's two enormous, glowing hydrogen tanks
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Follow the spiral staircase down to the bottom level to see the Aqua's two enormous, glowing hydrogen tanks
The spiral staircase is one of several breathtaking moments Sinot has created in the Aqua
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The spiral staircase is one of several breathtaking moments Sinot has created in the Aqua
A hydrogen-powered superyacht with a 3,750-nautical-mile range
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A hydrogen-powered superyacht with a 3,750-nautical-mile range
Looking down on the Aqua's rear decks
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Looking down on the Aqua's rear decks
Sinot's hydrogen-powered Aqua superyacht is an extraordinary design
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Sinot's hydrogen-powered Aqua superyacht is an extraordinary design
That eVTOL render appears to be a rebranded version of the Alakai Skai, which is also hydrogen-powered
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That eVTOL render appears to be a rebranded version of the Alakai Skai, which is also hydrogen-powered
Nice sized pool on the exterior deck
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Nice sized pool on the exterior deck
The "water cascade" feature
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The "water cascade" feature
Decent looking view to work up a sweat in front of
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Decent looking view to work up a sweat in front of
The wall in the "hydro massage" room is another highlight
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The wall in the "hydro massage" room is another highlight
Master bathroom
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Master bathroom
Master bedroom
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Master bedroom
The "owners pavillion" has a hot and cold tub
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The "owners pavillion" has a hot and cold tub
The attention to interior design in these renders is pretty astounding
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The attention to interior design in these renders is pretty astounding
The water cascade is a nice feature
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The water cascade is a nice feature
The spa lobby offers more circular design highights
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The spa lobby offers more circular design highights
Sinot Aqua specification sheet
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Sinot Aqua specification sheet
Anatomy of a hydrogen powertrain
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Anatomy of a hydrogen powertrain
The upper deck lounge: tastefully done
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The upper deck lounge: tastefully done
The wheelhouse
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The wheelhouse

Hydrogen power could be coming to the superyacht scene in a pretty spectacular way, with Dutch company Sinot's latest concept just unveiled in Monaco. The Aqua is a 360-foot (112-m) monster that would run entirely on liquid hydrogen and offer a range of 3,750 nautical miles (4,315 mi, 6,945 km). And boy, is it nice to look at from just about any angle.

The Aqua's huge hydrogen tanks are one of its many design highlights; to visit them, you take the spiral staircase in the center of the boat down to the lowest of five decks, and there they are, glowing with blue light. Two 28-ton, vacuum-isolated tanks designed to keep the liquid hydrogen stable at -253° C (-423.4° F) sitting behind strengthened glass for safety.

These tanks can split off power at up to 4 MW, powering two 1-MW electric propulsion motors and two 300-kW bow thrusters for tighter maneuvering. A 1.5-MWh battery pack acts as a buffer, providing instant access to power and running the ship's electrics, and is charged as necessary by the fuel cell.

Follow the spiral staircase down to the bottom level to see the Aqua's two enormous, glowing hydrogen tanks
Follow the spiral staircase down to the bottom level to see the Aqua's two enormous, glowing hydrogen tanks

The Aqua can reach a lazy top speed of 17 knots (20 mph, 31 km/h), and it carries enough fuel to cruise at 10-12 knots for some 3,750 nautical miles, which would get you from New York to Barcelona without filling up. As for where you're going to find 56 tons of liquid hydrogen, well, that's your problem, and if you've got the money to buy 360-ft hydrogen superyachts, well, you're a resourceful sort, you'll figure it out.

On top of its alternative powertrain, the Aqua stands out for some seriously gorgeous design work. Sinot has put considerable effort into creating a number of jaw-dropping moments as you explore this colossal thing. There are those beautifully lit hydrogen tanks, a mini-waterfall cascading down from the deck pool over stone steps, and a "bow observatory" right at the front, where two people can enjoy a sun-lounge version of the Titanic moment through giant windows.

The water cascade is a nice feature
The water cascade is a nice feature

The chairs in the lounge rotate around a circular track on the floor, clustering together when it's time to watch a movie, or spreading around the floor for more conversational social events. There appears to be the option of a helipad, where a hydrogen-powered eVTOL like the Alakai Skai can transfer you to dry land. And the Japanese-influenced interior design work and furnishings that have been put into these renders are spectacular – par for the course for Sinot, it seems. Jump into the gallery or check out the video below to see what I mean.

That eVTOL render appears to be a rebranded version of the Alakai Skai, which is also hydrogen-powered
That eVTOL render appears to be a rebranded version of the Alakai Skai, which is also hydrogen-powered

Sinot is presenting the Aqua now at the Monaco Yacht Show, as an 80-inch (2-m) concept model. Can it be built? Sure, why not? Will it be built? I guess that depends on how many billionaires are in the market for superyachts that could get them stuck near some tropical archipelago in need of still rare, somewhat exotic fuels. But hey, you can always get more hydrogen shipped over on a diesel boat.

Sinot Aqua: Hydrogen-powered superyacht

Source: Sinot

10 comments
Worzel
If major shipping lines switched to hydrogen, the pollution of the oceans with ultra low grade diesel would disappear, and as a consequence Hydrogen would become universally available.
BlueOak
Watch the video - actually beautifully understated and classy design interior vs the too frequently gauche, tacky, over the top interiors of mega yachts. As to: “As for where you're going to find 56 tons of liquid hydrogen, well, that's your problem”... your challenges should be minimized if you stick to destinations nearby rocket launching facilities.
Douglas Rogers
This could roam the seas endlessly, like Jules Verne's Nautilus. Just needs a water surface deployable solar array, electrolysis plant, and hydrogen refrigerator. Would need solar cells in ten years.
MiladinTomović
They could even cover some of the potential energy boat gets from waves into hydrogen: just grab some of that sea water from below.
MiladinTomović
Wrote cover, meant convert
Gizzy Magpie
Hydrogen transport would have been very popular. The problem is making and transporting the fuel in sufficient quantities. Making hydrogen requires electrolysis. Think (1) unending sunlight, (2) limitless water. That pretty much limits H fuel production to a large river in the desert. And you need scores of those plants to power a true social infrastructure operating on H (cars, busses, etc.). Highly impractical. Cost to set up just one plant? Think $100B. Fossil oil demand will continue to rise for probably another 10+ years. Renewables will finally overtake fossils somewhere around 2040, and by 2050 fossils will be just 1/3 of our energy pool. Wish things would go faster, but you can't simply stop a huge juggernaut and turn it around. It takes time.
holdenmidfield
So reassuring to know that the ultra rich are going green...not. Geez, really? There is something deeply wrong. Can you feel it?
toni24
It looks so much like the Nautilus in "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" that I wonder if it can submerge like that Submarine. If not, then they missed a good bet that would have made it more appealing
Vernon Miles Kerr
More merchandise to fuel the perpetual "pissing-contest" between the world's oligarchs. My yacht is bigger, more fancy (and now) more ecologically woke, than yours! Neener, neener, neener!"
anthony88
All that hydrogen would float my boat...