Collectibles

Scottsdale Rare Car Auctions – 41 cars that sold for more than US$1 million in January

Scottsdale Rare Car Auctions –...
The four most expensive cars to sell at Scottsdale and appropriately, it's one each for the four elite rare car auction houses. From top left clockwise, a 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000, a 1964 Ferrari 250 LM was sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000, a 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider was sold by Gooding & Co. for US$7,700,000 and Carroll Shelby's personal 800 hp Cobra 427 Super Snake was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$5,115,000. All four cars are now in our top 100 most expensive cars of all time.
The four most expensive cars to sell at Scottsdale and appropriately, it's one each for the four elite rare car auction houses. From top left clockwise, a 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000, a 1964 Ferrari 250 LM was sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000, a 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider was sold by Gooding & Co. for US$7,700,000 and Carroll Shelby's personal 800 hp Cobra 427 Super Snake was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$5,115,000. All four cars are now in our top 100 most expensive cars of all time.
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The first of a new generation, the Carrera 6 Type 906 redefined the concept of a modern Porsche race car, and its influence would be felt for many years, setting the stage for the all-conquering 917 program. The Carrera 6 was an immediate success in motor sports, debuting with a class win at the 1966 24 Hours of Daytona. From there, 906s went on to capture class wins at Sebring and Monza, followed by an outright victory at the Targa Florio. At the 24 Hours of Le Mans, 906s placed 4-5-6-7 behind three seven-liter GT40 Mk IIs, outlasting the prototype entries from Ferrari, Chaparral, and Matra.In total, Porsche built approximately 65 examples of the Carrera 6 between 1966 and 1967. Primarily run by a variety of privateer teams, 906s remained competitive at the highest levels of international racing well into the early 1970s, a testament to their inherent strength and versatility. This 1966 Porsche 906 Carrera 6 sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,980,000.
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The first of a new generation, the Carrera 6 Type 906 redefined the concept of a modern Porsche race car, and its influence would be felt for many years, setting the stage for the all-conquering 917 program. The Carrera 6 was an immediate success in motor sports, debuting with a class win at the 1966 24 Hours of Daytona. From there, 906s went on to capture class wins at Sebring and Monza, followed by an outright victory at the Targa Florio. At the 24 Hours of Le Mans, 906s placed 4-5-6-7 behind three seven-liter GT40 Mk IIs, outlasting the prototype entries from Ferrari, Chaparral, and Matra.In total, Porsche built approximately 65 examples of the Carrera 6 between 1966 and 1967. Primarily run by a variety of privateer teams, 906s remained competitive at the highest levels of international racing well into the early 1970s, a testament to their inherent strength and versatility. This 1966 Porsche 906 Carrera 6 sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,980,000.
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
That this Miura SV Jota ONLY sold for US$1,897,500 is surprising as it has the capability of mixing it with its contemporaries at a track day, or winning a major Concours event. One of only a handful of Miuras SVs factory-converted to Jota specifications between 1971 and 1975, the exquisite SVJ was fully restored in 2007. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,897,500
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That this Miura SV Jota ONLY sold for US$1,897,500 is surprising as it has the capability of mixing it with its contemporaries at a track day, or winning a major Concours event. One of only a handful of Miuras SVs factory-converted to Jota specifications between 1971 and 1975, the exquisite SVJ was fully restored in 2007. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,897,500
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Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
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Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
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Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
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Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
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Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
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Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
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Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
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Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
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Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
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Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
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Narrowly missing the top priced spot of the week, this 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000
The most expensive car ever sold at Scottsdale was this 1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti which sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000
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The most expensive car ever sold at Scottsdale was this 1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti which sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000
The most expensive car ever sold at Scottsdale was this 1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti which sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000
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The most expensive car ever sold at Scottsdale was this 1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti which sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000
The most expensive car ever sold at Scottsdale was this 1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti which sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000
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The most expensive car ever sold at Scottsdale was this 1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti which sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000
The most expensive car ever sold at Scottsdale was this 1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti which sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000
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The most expensive car ever sold at Scottsdale was this 1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti which sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000
The most expensive car ever sold at Scottsdale was this 1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti which sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000
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The most expensive car ever sold at Scottsdale was this 1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti which sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000
This 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Series I Coupe Aerodinamico was sold by Gooding & Co. for US$4,070,000
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This 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Series I Coupe Aerodinamico was sold by Gooding & Co. for US$4,070,000
A symbol of the American auto industry at the height of its power and influence, this Futurliner sold for US$4,320,000 in January, 2006 and went under the hammer again at the same Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas event in January, 2015. The second time around, it sold for US$4,000,000 and drew another US$650,000 in pledges, with the full auction price and pldegs going to the Armed Forces Foundation.
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A symbol of the American auto industry at the height of its power and influence, this Futurliner sold for US$4,320,000 in January, 2006 and went under the hammer again at the same Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas event in January, 2015. The second time around, it sold for US$4,000,000 and drew another US$650,000 in pledges, with the full auction price and pldegs going to the Armed Forces Foundation.
This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
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This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
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This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
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This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
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This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
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This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
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This 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with coachwork by Scaglietti was delivered new in 1967 to film director John Frankenheimer. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,657,500 in January, 2015. Photo: Evan Klein ©2015
With only a handful of test miles accumulated since the completion of its restoration, and only 17,000 believed actual miles in all, this 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti is in absolutely immaculate condition. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,300,000. Photo: Robin Adams ©2014
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With only a handful of test miles accumulated since the completion of its restoration, and only 17,000 believed actual miles in all, this 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti is in absolutely immaculate condition. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,300,000. Photo: Robin Adams ©2014
With only a handful of test miles accumulated since the completion of its restoration, and only 17,000 believed actual miles in all, this 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti is in absolutely immaculate condition. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,300,000. Photo: Robin Adams ©2014
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With only a handful of test miles accumulated since the completion of its restoration, and only 17,000 believed actual miles in all, this 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti is in absolutely immaculate condition. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,300,000. Photo: Robin Adams ©2014
With only a handful of test miles accumulated since the completion of its restoration, and only 17,000 believed actual miles in all, this 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti is in absolutely immaculate condition. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,300,000. Photo: Robin Adams ©2014
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With only a handful of test miles accumulated since the completion of its restoration, and only 17,000 believed actual miles in all, this 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti is in absolutely immaculate condition. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,300,000. Photo: Robin Adams ©2014
With only a handful of test miles accumulated since the completion of its restoration, and only 17,000 believed actual miles in all, this 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti is in absolutely immaculate condition. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,300,000. Photo: Robin Adams ©2014
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With only a handful of test miles accumulated since the completion of its restoration, and only 17,000 believed actual miles in all, this 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti is in absolutely immaculate condition. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$3,300,000. Photo: Robin Adams ©2014
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
Sold in 2007 for US$5,500,000, Carroll Shelby’s personal 800 horsepower Super SnakeCobra crossed the auction block again on January 17, 2015, selling for US$5,115,000.
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Sold in 2007 for US$5,500,000, Carroll Shelby’s personal 800 horsepower Super SnakeCobra crossed the auction block again on January 17, 2015, selling for US$5,115,000.
One of just 99 examples produced, this 1968 Ferrari 330 GTS was completely restored to bare metal in 2000, and was sold by Gooding & Company with complete documentation by Ferrari Historian Marcel Massini for US$2,420,000.
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One of just 99 examples produced, this 1968 Ferrari 330 GTS was completely restored to bare metal in 2000, and was sold by Gooding & Company with complete documentation by Ferrari Historian Marcel Massini for US$2,420,000.
The 275 GTS premiered alongside the 275 GTB at the 1964 Paris Auto Show, and to the casual onlooker, these coupe siblings looked like completely different automobiles. Yet, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Both cars looked wholly different, but underneath they bore similar 3.3-liter Colombo V-12s, chassis, and suspensions. This 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS by Pininfarina sold by Gooding & Co. for US$2,420,000. Photo: Darin Schnabel ©2014
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The 275 GTS premiered alongside the 275 GTB at the 1964 Paris Auto Show, and to the casual onlooker, these coupe siblings looked like completely different automobiles. Yet, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Both cars looked wholly different, but underneath they bore similar 3.3-liter Colombo V-12s, chassis, and suspensions. This 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS by Pininfarina sold by Gooding & Co. for US$2,420,000. Photo: Darin Schnabel ©2014
As the last 250 GT model, the Lusso was the culmination of a decade of steady chassis development and benefited from a rugged yet compliant suspension, four-wheel disc brakes, and the brilliant three-liter V-12. The Lusso’s exquisite coachwork, designed by Pininfarina and constructed by Carrozzeria Scaglietti, has always received great acclaim. Chuck Jordan of General Motors Styling Department famously remarked that “Pininfarina’s Ferrari Berlinetta Lusso exhibits for all time that transformation of form and function into the spiritual presence by which great art transcends mere art.” This 1963 Ferrari 250 GT Lusso sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,925,000.
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As the last 250 GT model, the Lusso was the culmination of a decade of steady chassis development and benefited from a rugged yet compliant suspension, four-wheel disc brakes, and the brilliant three-liter V-12. The Lusso’s exquisite coachwork, designed by Pininfarina and constructed by Carrozzeria Scaglietti, has always received great acclaim. Chuck Jordan of General Motors Styling Department famously remarked that “Pininfarina’s Ferrari Berlinetta Lusso exhibits for all time that transformation of form and function into the spiritual presence by which great art transcends mere art.” This 1963 Ferrari 250 GT Lusso sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,925,000.
A genuine factory-spec 427 Street Cobra in its factory correct original shade of Vineyard Green. The car was sold with a full history and was the recipient of a recent no-expense-spared, nut and bolt restoration. Well-documented by the Shelby American Registry, original drivetrain, unmodified body and original Sunburst wheels. Sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$1,595,000.
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A genuine factory-spec 427 Street Cobra in its factory correct original shade of Vineyard Green. The car was sold with a full history and was the recipient of a recent no-expense-spared, nut and bolt restoration. Well-documented by the Shelby American Registry, original drivetrain, unmodified body and original Sunburst wheels. Sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$1,595,000.
A genuine factory-spec 427 Street Cobra in its factory correct original shade of Vineyard Green. The car was sold with a full history and was the recipient of a recent no-expense-spared, nut and bolt restoration. Well-documented by the Shelby American Registry, original drivetrain, unmodified body and original Sunburst wheels. Sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$1,595,000.
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A genuine factory-spec 427 Street Cobra in its factory correct original shade of Vineyard Green. The car was sold with a full history and was the recipient of a recent no-expense-spared, nut and bolt restoration. Well-documented by the Shelby American Registry, original drivetrain, unmodified body and original Sunburst wheels. Sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$1,595,000.
One of only 200 examples built and upgraded in period to six-carb induction, this car was sold with a complete history documented by Ferrari Historian Marcel Massini, and a continuous 45-Year ownership. It sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,595,000
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One of only 200 examples built and upgraded in period to six-carb induction, this car was sold with a complete history documented by Ferrari Historian Marcel Massini, and a continuous 45-Year ownership. It sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,595,000
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
One of just eight built using the SWB chassis of the Grand Prix cars, this Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport, this car has almost identical mechanicals to the T26 which won the Le Mans 24 Hour race in 1950. It is one of only three Grand Sports with Franay coachwork and the only one fitted with a sunroof. The six-cylinder DOHC 4.5 Liter engine with its three carburettors also comes from the Grand Prix car, and produces nearly 200 hp, making it one of the fastest road cars available at the time. This car came with a detailed history, including receipts and pictures of a frame-off Concours-level restoration costing hundreds of thousands of dollars - it was recently displayed on the lawn at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. It is also eligible for the premier historic events, such as the Mille Miglia and California Mille. It sold for US$1,650,000.
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One of just eight built using the SWB chassis of the Grand Prix cars, this Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport, this car has almost identical mechanicals to the T26 which won the Le Mans 24 Hour race in 1950. It is one of only three Grand Sports with Franay coachwork and the only one fitted with a sunroof. The six-cylinder DOHC 4.5 Liter engine with its three carburettors also comes from the Grand Prix car, and produces nearly 200 hp, making it one of the fastest road cars available at the time. This car came with a detailed history, including receipts and pictures of a frame-off Concours-level restoration costing hundreds of thousands of dollars - it was recently displayed on the lawn at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. It is also eligible for the premier historic events, such as the Mille Miglia and California Mille. It sold for US$1,650,000.
Designed by Ferdinand A. Porsche, (grandson of founder), the two-seat Type 904 competition coupe utilized a mid-engine boxed steel ladder tubing frame and composite body panels bonded to the frame, creating a semi-monocoque. In its inaugural 1964 season, the 904 GTS won at Sebring, the Targa Florio, Spa, the Nürburgring 1000 KM, the 24 Hours of Le Mans (a 1-4 class sweep), the 12 Hours of Reims, the Coppa Inter-Europa, the Tour de France, the Bridgehampton 500 KM, and the 1000 KM of Paris. In U.S. amateur racing, the 904 was considered potent enough to be classed with the much more powerful big block Corvettes and Cobras, and it still acquitted itself admirably. Porsche produced just over 100 of these exquisite coupes, before it was superceded by the space-framed 906. This 1965 Porsche 904 Carrera GTS was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,650,000.
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Designed by Ferdinand A. Porsche, (grandson of founder), the two-seat Type 904 competition coupe utilized a mid-engine boxed steel ladder tubing frame and composite body panels bonded to the frame, creating a semi-monocoque. In its inaugural 1964 season, the 904 GTS won at Sebring, the Targa Florio, Spa, the Nürburgring 1000 KM, the 24 Hours of Le Mans (a 1-4 class sweep), the 12 Hours of Reims, the Coppa Inter-Europa, the Tour de France, the Bridgehampton 500 KM, and the 1000 KM of Paris. In U.S. amateur racing, the 904 was considered potent enough to be classed with the much more powerful big block Corvettes and Cobras, and it still acquitted itself admirably. Porsche produced just over 100 of these exquisite coupes, before it was superceded by the space-framed 906. This 1965 Porsche 904 Carrera GTS was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,650,000.
Following the 953’s win in the 1984 Paris-Dakar, Porsche decided to build a “Super Porsche” – a turbocharged 911 variant with all-wheel drive and variable ride height. The result was the 959, a technological masterpiece and arguably the most technically advanced automobile built during the 1980s: a race-proven 450 bhp, twin-turbocharged flat six, a six-speed transaxle, state-of-the-art PSK variable differentials, and aerodynamically effective composite bodywork. In 1986, the 959 finished 1-2 in the Paris-Dakar and the Group B car won its class at the Le Mans 24 Hours. Just 284 959s were built in two configurations, Komfort and Sport. Only 29 Sport models were built, and this car is built to the even rarer Factory Stage II Spec. It has an outstanding maintenance history Including a full €55,000 Porsche Classic Service in 2011. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,705,000.
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Following the 953’s win in the 1984 Paris-Dakar, Porsche decided to build a “Super Porsche” – a turbocharged 911 variant with all-wheel drive and variable ride height. The result was the 959, a technological masterpiece and arguably the most technically advanced automobile built during the 1980s: a race-proven 450 bhp, twin-turbocharged flat six, a six-speed transaxle, state-of-the-art PSK variable differentials, and aerodynamically effective composite bodywork. In 1986, the 959 finished 1-2 in the Paris-Dakar and the Group B car won its class at the Le Mans 24 Hours. Just 284 959s were built in two configurations, Komfort and Sport. Only 29 Sport models were built, and this car is built to the even rarer Factory Stage II Spec. It has an outstanding maintenance history Including a full €55,000 Porsche Classic Service in 2011. It was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,705,000.
First shown at the 1955 Frankfurt Motor Show were two new variations on the V-8-powered BMW 502: the 503 and the 507. Though both models were designed by Count Albrecht von Goertz, it was the spectacular 507 that stole the show. With a rigid box frame, upgraded suspension, synchromesh gearbox, and large Al-fn drum brakes, the 507 possessed an ideal foundation for BMW’s robust twin-carburetor V-8 engine. The 507 was capable of 125 mph–135 mph and offered brilliant acceleration, reaching 0 to 60 mph in less than 10 seconds. Initially intended to fill a gap between the lower-priced English imports and the phenomenally expensive Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster, the 507 commanded a princely US$8,988, making it one of the most expensive and exclusive cars of its day. As a result, the elegant BMW attracted celebrities as diverse as Elvis Presley and motor sports hero John Surtees. One of just 252 examples built, this 1959 BMW 507 Series II sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,815,000.
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First shown at the 1955 Frankfurt Motor Show were two new variations on the V-8-powered BMW 502: the 503 and the 507. Though both models were designed by Count Albrecht von Goertz, it was the spectacular 507 that stole the show. With a rigid box frame, upgraded suspension, synchromesh gearbox, and large Al-fn drum brakes, the 507 possessed an ideal foundation for BMW’s robust twin-carburetor V-8 engine. The 507 was capable of 125 mph–135 mph and offered brilliant acceleration, reaching 0 to 60 mph in less than 10 seconds. Initially intended to fill a gap between the lower-priced English imports and the phenomenally expensive Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster, the 507 commanded a princely US$8,988, making it one of the most expensive and exclusive cars of its day. As a result, the elegant BMW attracted celebrities as diverse as Elvis Presley and motor sports hero John Surtees. One of just 252 examples built, this 1959 BMW 507 Series II sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,815,000.
It's not often that a genuine Formula One Grand Prix winner comes up for auction, but this Ferrari 641/2 was campaigned during the 1990 F1 Season by Nigel Mansell, winning the 1990 Portuguese Grand Prix and scoring two further podiums in Spain and Australia. In 1992–1993 the car underwent a complete rebuild at the Ferrari factory. Pure gold at US$990,000.
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It's not often that a genuine Formula One Grand Prix winner comes up for auction, but this Ferrari 641/2 was campaigned during the 1990 F1 Season by Nigel Mansell, winning the 1990 Portuguese Grand Prix and scoring two further podiums in Spain and Australia. In 1992–1993 the car underwent a complete rebuild at the Ferrari factory. Pure gold at US$990,000.
While much has been written about this Cobra, it is most famous for its appearances in promotional pieces for the menswear company, Mr. Formal Wear, the most famous of which depicts a buxom blonde, clad in white tuxedo shirt, bow tie, high heels, and nothing else, chatting on a payphone next to the Cobra before two astonished onlookers. Another piece, famously titled “Some Guys Have It Tough,” depicts the Cobra beachside, with its driver and his lovely passenger skinny-dipping in the distance. Those posters appeared on bedroom and workshop walls all over the country and became legend among Cobra enthusiasts. This is THAT car. It sold for $990,000.
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While much has been written about this Cobra, it is most famous for its appearances in promotional pieces for the menswear company, Mr. Formal Wear, the most famous of which depicts a buxom blonde, clad in white tuxedo shirt, bow tie, high heels, and nothing else, chatting on a payphone next to the Cobra before two astonished onlookers. Another piece, famously titled “Some Guys Have It Tough,” depicts the Cobra beachside, with its driver and his lovely passenger skinny-dipping in the distance. Those posters appeared on bedroom and workshop walls all over the country and became legend among Cobra enthusiasts. This is THAT car. It sold for $990,000.
Ford donated the coveted VIN 001 of the new GT350R Ford Shelby for auction at Barrett-Jackson with all proceeds going to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the leading organization focused on type 1 diabetes research in the world. The all-new Shelby GT350R features the first-ever production V8 from Ford with a flat-plane crankshaft, the most powerful naturally aspirated engine Ford has ever produced, plus a specially tuned suspension. The Shelby GT350R sold for US$1 million.
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Ford donated the coveted VIN 001 of the new GT350R Ford Shelby for auction at Barrett-Jackson with all proceeds going to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the leading organization focused on type 1 diabetes research in the world. The all-new Shelby GT350R features the first-ever production V8 from Ford with a flat-plane crankshaft, the most powerful naturally aspirated engine Ford has ever produced, plus a specially tuned suspension. The Shelby GT350R sold for US$1 million.
This Shelby Cobra 289 (CSX2570) was one of the Shelby American display cars at the 1965 New York Auto Show. The Bonhams' page details a delightful story of this car being deeply loved in one family from 1965 until 2011, being passed from father to son and being driven and serviced so that it never needed any major restoration work. Great story. It sold for US$1,017,500
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This Shelby Cobra 289 (CSX2570) was one of the Shelby American display cars at the 1965 New York Auto Show. The Bonhams' page details a delightful story of this car being deeply loved in one family from 1965 until 2011, being passed from father to son and being driven and serviced so that it never needed any major restoration work. Great story. It sold for US$1,017,500
Replete with many luxurious styling features of its big brothers, the 500K and 540K (many of which are in the top 100 most expensive cars of all-time), this elegant 1937 Mercedes-Benz 320 Cabriolet B sold for US$1,045,000, indicating the strength of the entire Mercedes-Benz brand in the pre-war period.
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Replete with many luxurious styling features of its big brothers, the 500K and 540K (many of which are in the top 100 most expensive cars of all-time), this elegant 1937 Mercedes-Benz 320 Cabriolet B sold for US$1,045,000, indicating the strength of the entire Mercedes-Benz brand in the pre-war period.
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
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The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage. It sold for US$1.1 million in Scottsdale
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage. It sold for US$1.1 million in Scottsdale
One of just 338 Lamborghini Miura P400S-models ever made, this 1970 model sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,155,000.
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One of just 338 Lamborghini Miura P400S-models ever made, this 1970 model sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,155,000.
This highly original and unrestored, low-mileage 289 Cobra was sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,155,000.
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This highly original and unrestored, low-mileage 289 Cobra was sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,155,000.
This 1957 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,210,000
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This 1957 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,210,000
This 1958 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster spent the majority of its life in the loving care of one owner who kept it next to his Lamborghini Miura. When the original owner passed away, the car was sold to well-known Utah-based car enthusiast Jack Plumb, who stripped the body back to the metal in a complete restoration. The car's indicated mileage of under 57,000 is original and it was sold by Bonhams for US$1,237,500, complete with its original books, tools, and the factory hard top in its original wooden German shipping crate.
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This 1958 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster spent the majority of its life in the loving care of one owner who kept it next to his Lamborghini Miura. When the original owner passed away, the car was sold to well-known Utah-based car enthusiast Jack Plumb, who stripped the body back to the metal in a complete restoration. The car's indicated mileage of under 57,000 is original and it was sold by Bonhams for US$1,237,500, complete with its original books, tools, and the factory hard top in its original wooden German shipping crate.
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
The Maserati 3500 GT was launched at the 1957 Geneva Motor Show. This 1961 Maserati 3500 GT Spyder by Vignale was originally a Maserati factory demonstration unit, and comes with the 220 bhp, 3,485 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with the preferred triple Weber 42 DCOE carburettors. It was recently fully restored and sold by RM Auctions with a full history for US$1,347,500. Images: Dan Savinelli ©2014
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The Maserati 3500 GT was launched at the 1957 Geneva Motor Show. This 1961 Maserati 3500 GT Spyder by Vignale was originally a Maserati factory demonstration unit, and comes with the 220 bhp, 3,485 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with the preferred triple Weber 42 DCOE carburettors. It was recently fully restored and sold by RM Auctions with a full history for US$1,347,500. Images: Dan Savinelli ©2014
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
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The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
In every respect, this 1960 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster is a benchmark example of the legendary 300 SL Roadster – an exclusive and important Mercedes-Benz of unrivalled beauty and sophistication, whose authenticity, exceptional originality, and magnetic presence place it among the top tier of collectible automobiles. Read the auction description for the finer detail, but the car sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,567,500
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In every respect, this 1960 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster is a benchmark example of the legendary 300 SL Roadster – an exclusive and important Mercedes-Benz of unrivalled beauty and sophistication, whose authenticity, exceptional originality, and magnetic presence place it among the top tier of collectible automobiles. Read the auction description for the finer detail, but the car sold by Gooding & Co. for US$1,567,500
This 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB by Scaglietti sold by RM Auctions for US$2,750,000
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This 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB by Scaglietti sold by RM Auctions for US$2,750,000
The second GTO was not something that Ferrari took lightly. The 288 GTO is most likely to follow a similar appreciation curve as its predecessor, though with 200 available, there's still time to get into one before they start bringing really silly prices. This 1984 Ferrari 288 GTO sold by RM Auctions for US$2,750,000 at Scottsdale, indicating that the time is nigh.
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The second GTO was not something that Ferrari took lightly. The 288 GTO is most likely to follow a similar appreciation curve as its predecessor, though with 200 available, there's still time to get into one before they start bringing really silly prices. This 1984 Ferrari 288 GTO sold by RM Auctions for US$2,750,000 at Scottsdale, indicating that the time is nigh.
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
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If you've made it to this point in the article, you'll no doubt know what an FXX is. Based on the Ferrari Enzo, it is a prototype race car built by Ferrari for its elite customers. The full auction description is worth a read. Like all FXXs, it has been fully maintained by the factory. Rare, super high tech, and with it's 860 hp 6.2 liter V-12 producing 860 hp, scarier than Genghis Khan unless you really know what you're doing.This car was the first customer FXX produced and has only been used three times on track days. Sold by RM Auctions for US$1,622,500. Images: Erik Fuller
The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
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The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
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The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
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The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
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The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
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The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
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The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
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The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
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The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
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The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
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The silent sportscar and a positioning that was unique. With a body made of light alloy, the Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. This 1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports by Mulliner sold by RM Auctions for US$1,525,000. Images: Darin Schnabel
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
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Once owned by no less a far-sighted collector than Otis Chandler, this 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Sport Phaeton is a genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard and one of just two known examples built by Dietrich on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis. The full auction description is worth reading. This exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000. Photos: Michael Furman ©2015
One of two Ferraris campaigned by Scuderia Filipinetti which sold for more than US$9 million at Scottsdale.
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One of two Ferraris campaigned by Scuderia Filipinetti which sold for more than US$9 million at Scottsdale.
David Gooding and auctioneer Charlie Ross put the 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Aerodinamico Coupe under the hammer
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David Gooding and auctioneer Charlie Ross put the 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Aerodinamico Coupe under the hammer
David Gooding and auctioneer Charlie Ross put Jack Castor's Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder under the hammer
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David Gooding and auctioneer Charlie Ross put Jack Castor's Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder under the hammer
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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The $4 million 1950 General Motors Futurliner certainly stands out in a crowd.
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The $4 million 1950 General Motors Futurliner certainly stands out in a crowd.
This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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This 1954 Pontiac Bonneville Concept Car is one of just two created by General Motors. Under the direction of the legendary designer Harley Earl, Hommer LaGassey and Paul Gilland were directed to build two Bonneville Specials. The bronze car debut in the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf in New York and the green one in the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Los Angeles. This car was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$3,300,000.
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Replete with many luxurious styling features of its big brothers, the 500K and 540K (many of which are in the top 100 most expensive cars of all-time), this elegant 1937 Mercedes-Benz 320 Cabriolet B sold for US$1,045,000, indicating the strength of the entire Mercedes-Benz brand in the pre-war period.
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Replete with many luxurious styling features of its big brothers, the 500K and 540K (many of which are in the top 100 most expensive cars of all-time), this elegant 1937 Mercedes-Benz 320 Cabriolet B sold for US$1,045,000, indicating the strength of the entire Mercedes-Benz brand in the pre-war period.
Twelve General Motors Futurliners were built for the travelling Motorama exhibit which visited small town America in the fifties - that's all of them.
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Twelve General Motors Futurliners were built for the travelling Motorama exhibit which visited small town America in the fifties - that's all of them.
The four most expensive cars to sell at Scottsdale and appropriately, it's one each for the four elite rare car auction houses. From top left clockwise, a 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000, a 1964 Ferrari 250 LM was sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000, a 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider was sold by Gooding & Co. for US$7,700,000 and Carroll Shelby's personal 800 hp Cobra 427 Super Snake was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$5,115,000. All four cars are now in our top 100 most expensive cars of all time.
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The four most expensive cars to sell at Scottsdale and appropriately, it's one each for the four elite rare car auction houses. From top left clockwise, a 1966 Ferrari 275GTB Competizione was sold by Bonhams for US$9,405,000, a 1964 Ferrari 250 LM was sold by RM Auctions for US$9,625,000, a 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider was sold by Gooding & Co. for US$7,700,000 and Carroll Shelby's personal 800 hp Cobra 427 Super Snake was sold by Barrett-Jackson for US$5,115,000. All four cars are now in our top 100 most expensive cars of all time.
The LM goes under the hammer as viewed from the internet.
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The LM goes under the hammer as viewed from the internet.
RM's star auctioneer at marquee events is Max Girardo. Max is fluent in English, French, Spanish, and Italian, switching seamlessly to the language of a buyer as required then back to the language of the main audience. He also loves his cars, competes in motorsport regularly and really knows how to entertain a crowd. Max has been in the vintage automobile industry since 1998, having joined Brooks Auctioneers (now Bonhams) as a car specialist in 1998. Max, BTW, is also the Managing Director of RM Europe. All the auctions from RM (and indeed, all the key automotive auctioneers such as Bonhams, Gooding & Co, Mecum and Barrett-Jackson, can be viewed live on the internet, As television audiences are increasingly finding out, auctions about the focus of your investment of passion make for particularly compelling viewing.
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RM's star auctioneer at marquee events is Max Girardo. Max is fluent in English, French, Spanish, and Italian, switching seamlessly to the language of a buyer as required then back to the language of the main audience. He also loves his cars, competes in motorsport regularly and really knows how to entertain a crowd. Max has been in the vintage automobile industry since 1998, having joined Brooks Auctioneers (now Bonhams) as a car specialist in 1998. Max, BTW, is also the Managing Director of RM Europe. All the auctions from RM (and indeed, all the key automotive auctioneers such as Bonhams, Gooding & Co, Mecum and Barrett-Jackson, can be viewed live on the internet, As television audiences are increasingly finding out, auctions about the focus of your investment of passion make for particularly compelling viewing.
The Ferrari LM deserved its top spot during auction week. Wickedly fast, stunningly beautiful and an asset certain to appreciate. What's more, despite being the wrong side of 50, it'll hold its own against modern cars through any stretch of swervery.
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The Ferrari LM deserved its top spot during auction week. Wickedly fast, stunningly beautiful and an asset certain to appreciate. What's more, despite being the wrong side of 50, it'll hold its own against modern cars through any stretch of swervery.
The Ferrari 250 LM crosses the block, leading the Ferrari domination of rare car auctions once more. Two cars tied for tenth place at Scottsdale, meaning the "top ten" contained eleven cars - eight of which emanated from Maranello.
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The Ferrari 250 LM crosses the block, leading the Ferrari domination of rare car auctions once more. Two cars tied for tenth place at Scottsdale, meaning the "top ten" contained eleven cars - eight of which emanated from Maranello.
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,485,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
The Mercedes-Benz 300 SL (W 198) and the 190 SL (W 121) dominate the stand of Mercedes-Benz importer Maximilian Hoffman at the New York International Motor Sports Show on February 6, 1954. The show was the international debut for the car, the first time that a car had been shown outside Germany before it was shown inside Germany.
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The Mercedes-Benz 300 SL (W 198) and the 190 SL (W 121) dominate the stand of Mercedes-Benz importer Maximilian Hoffman at the New York International Motor Sports Show on February 6, 1954. The show was the international debut for the car, the first time that a car had been shown outside Germany before it was shown inside Germany.
The German debut of the 300 SL and 190 SL was at the 1955 Frankfurt International Motor Show.
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The German debut of the 300 SL and 190 SL was at the 1955 Frankfurt International Motor Show.
At left, the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL (W 198) and the 190 SL (W 121) dominate the stand of Mercedes-Benz importer Maximilian Hoffman at the New York International Motor Sports Show on February 6, 1954. The show was the international debut for the car, the first time that a car had been shown outside Germany before it was shown inside Germany. The German debut of the 300 SL and 190 SL was at the 1955 Frankfurt International Motor Show (right).
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At left, the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL (W 198) and the 190 SL (W 121) dominate the stand of Mercedes-Benz importer Maximilian Hoffman at the New York International Motor Sports Show on February 6, 1954. The show was the international debut for the car, the first time that a car had been shown outside Germany before it was shown inside Germany. The German debut of the 300 SL and 190 SL was at the 1955 Frankfurt International Motor Show (right).
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
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Instantly recognisable as the Mercedes-Benz 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe, this 1955 model was built with DB 534 Feuerwehrrot (Fire Brigade Red) paintwork for its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. At the end of 1945, Lord O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. The entire history of the car and the model is detailed on the official auction page. The car was sold by Bonhams for US$1,375,000.
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
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In 1986, Porsche claimed the title of the world's fastest road car when it introduced the 959 which could achieve 197 mph. Ferrari's answer was this car, the F40, which was developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione. Using advanced aerodynamics and a 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, the F40 was the first production car to break the 200 mph barrier, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,265,000. Photos: Robin Adams ©2015
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
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This 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing has been driven just 200 miles since a 2,000 hour nut-and-bolt restoration, and has lived the last decade in a climate-controlled garage.
The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
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The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
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The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
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The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
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The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
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The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
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The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with U.S. DOT and emissions standards. That didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a few stateside under the Show and Display Law which was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen. This 1988 Porsche 959 Komfort was sold by RM Auctions for US$1,045,000 in Scottsdale.
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The second of two Porsche 959s sold at Scottsdale was this Komfort Model. Only 284 959s were ever made, and 255 were Komfort models. Such was the development cost of the Porsche "halo" car that even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on the project. As such, those that were built were destined for Porsche’s favorite customers and most went to Eur