Bus

  • ​If you've ever ridden a shuttle, there's a chance it was a Toyota Coaster. More than 550,000 have been sold since the model name was adopted in 1969, serving as shuttles and minibuses in more than 110 countries. After 24 years of loyal service, the Coaster is being replaced with a safer new model.
  • Volvo unveiled the chassis for what it's calling the largest bus in the world at the FetransRio exhibition in Rio de Janeiro last week​. Destined for service in South America, the Gran Artic 300 will have room for 300 passengers inside its bendy bi-articulating body when it reaches production.
  • Along with the Mirai hydrogen fuel cell car​, Toyota has invested in fueling stations and infrastructure to make sure fuel cell vehicles aren't an under-supported flash in the pan, experience that will pay off when sales of its 77-seater Fuel Cell Bus start early next year.
  • Volvo goes to some effort to protect the safety of not just passengers inside its vehicles, but those on the outside, too. Now the company is fitting its detection tech to its fleet of buses, which will begin automatically sounding warnings to alert unprotected road users of potential collisions.
  • Proterra latest electric bus, the Catalyst E2, has logged more the 600 miles (966 km) on a single charge under test conditions at the Michelin proving grounds in South Carolina.​
  • ​A couple of months back, when a full-scale prototype of China's bizarre bestriding bus was promised for July, we didn't actually expect to see one on the road so soon. Well, the wheels are starting to turn on this extraordinary traffic and pollution solution.
  • Switzerland has joined a growing number of places around the world exploring the potential of electric autonomous buses, with a pair of driverless shuttles now ferrying passengers around the city of Sion as part of a two-year trial.
  • Once you've dragged yourself to work and back, it can be difficult to find the time or motivation to go to the gym. London-based gym 1Rebel has come up with a solution in the form of a fleet of buses converted into mobile spinning studios. Passengers will be able to exercise during their commute.
  • ​London’s first fully transparent solar bus shelter was unveiled on Friday. The shelter is reported capable of producing enough electricity for a London home for a year and was designed and developed by UK solar technology company Polysolar.
  • Toyota and Hino Motors have begun testing a jointly-developed fuel cell bus in Tokyo, Japan. The brief test, which is taking place on public roads in the central and waterfront areas of the city, is designed to will help Toyota improve the technology ahead of a possible market launch.
  • Next month, Gothenburg's public transport will get a little bit greener. The Swedish city will see the introduction of its first fully electric buses. According to Volvo, which makes the vehicles, they use 80 percent less energy than diesel equivalents.
  • One man's waste is another's man's bus fuel, so the saying might now go. Indeed, next time people in the UK go for a number two, they could be powering the number two bus. Geneco's new Bio-Bus is powered by gas generated via the treatment of sewage and food waste.