Urban Transport

Delfast enters final phase of electric trike frame development

Delfast enters final phase of ...
A render showing what the Delfast electric tricycle is expected to look like
A render showing what the Delfast electric tricycle is expected to look like
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A render showing what the Delfast electric tricycle is expected to look like
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A render showing what the Delfast electric tricycle is expected to look like
The e-trike will feature a 750-W brushless motor for a top speed of 42 km/h, a battery pack that's good for all weather travel up to 100 km per charge, and a modular cargo platform behind the rider
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The e-trike will feature a 750-W brushless motor for a top speed of 42 km/h, a battery pack that's good for all weather travel up to 100 km per charge, and a modular cargo platform behind the rider
The steel frame will be 2,500 mm long, and there will be 950 mm between the rear wheels
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The steel frame will be 2,500 mm long, and there will be 950 mm between the rear wheels
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Regular readers may know Delfast for its long-range, powerful ebikes like the record-holding Prime and the business-focused Partner, but the Ukraine-based company announced that it was branching out to three-wheelers in April. And now the design of the frame is done, and engineers are prepping for manufacture.

The Delfast e-tricycle is being aimed at small to medium businesses looking for a greener way to deliver goods around the city, and the project has received support from the USAID Competitive Economy Program in Ukraine. Sketches by engineers in April quickly became computer-aided designs, and prototyping began.

It will have a modular cargo platform to the rear that can be adapted for hauling goods or people, with the maximum load being around 300 kg (660 lb). Delfast is treating it to a 750-W brushless rear motor for a top throttle speed of 42 km/h (26 mph) in the US and 25 km/h (15.5 mph) in Europe, and per charge range is expected to be about the 100 km (68 mi) mark.

Last month, the company's Serhii Goncharov added some overhead protection for the rider that would double as a windshield, which could be installed or removed as needed. A robust battery pack was also selected for the electric trike that would allow for use in extreme weather conditions, and work started on a stationary charger.

The e-trike will feature a 750-W brushless motor for a top speed of 42 km/h, a battery pack that's good for all weather travel up to 100 km per charge, and a modular cargo platform behind the rider
The e-trike will feature a 750-W brushless motor for a top speed of 42 km/h, a battery pack that's good for all weather travel up to 100 km per charge, and a modular cargo platform behind the rider

Now the 3D model of the e-tricycle has been completed, with the primary material for the 2,500-mm-long (98.4 in) frame chosen after durability simulations were conducted. That material is steel, which is cheaper, more malleable and more readily available than lighter but more fragile aluminum. It looks like the frame will also boast an enduro-like look to the front – to fit in with the company's range of two-wheeled ebikes – and can be had in a number of color options.

A manufacturing timeline has not been revealed at this time, though design documentation is currently being prepared for the manufacturing facilities and machinery templates created, so we may not have to wait too long for photos of the first model to appear.

Delfast has been quite busy of late, taking a Top 1.0 ebike out to Kyiv Chaika Airfield in June to try and pull a Yak-18T aircraft weighing 1.7 tons (3,400 lb) – the attempt was unsuccessful, but the company's CEO identified the issue and has vowed to try again – and working on a new seat post design that will accommodate both a bicycle or a motorcycle saddle (though not at the same time), with cargo attachments built in.

We'll bring you more news when we have it. Meanwhile, you can watch the failed Top 1.0 power experiment in the video below.

Delfast first experiment - full version

Source: Delfast

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2 comments
ljaques
Too bad they didn't try to pull a Cessna 172. It's 1,000# lighter.
foxpup
I can see this product being useful in places where the sun is occasionally directly overhead but not in the temperate or frigid climates. That said, there are lots of people who need stuff like this in the tropics, just not me. Policy and vehicle makers need to remember such diversities. An EV that isn't enclosed with AC and heating in my neighborhood would be justifiably laughed at as impractical. That said, this could be a good option for some, even for people near me if they have a place to store it for the winter and a good cold-season alternative.