Collectibles

14 "Million Dollar Cars" sell at six auctions in eight days

14 "Million Dollar Cars" sell ...
Continued bouyant sales indicate that the collectible car market is cruising along at record levels with no signs of slackening.
Continued bouyant sales indicate that the collectible car market is cruising along at record levels with no signs of slackening.
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One of the cars with a more interesting provenance to sell in the last few weeks was this 1976 MERCEDES-BENZ 450 SEL SEDAN 6.9 which was once owned by famous French he collection includes a 1977 Mercedes 450 SEL 6.9, that was originally owned by famous French singer and composer, Claude François. It is the car in which he famously survived an attempted assassination in 1977. Claude, or CloClo to his fans, was one of France's biggest pop stars, with a legacy that continues today as he continues to be one of the country's biggest-selling recording artists. Claude famously wrote and composed the original version of 'My Way', a song made internationally famous by Frank Sinatra. The car sold for € 92,000 ($103,665) and can be seen at the auction page complete with bullet holes (which had subsequently been repaired).Throughout his career Claude sold some 70 million records,
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One of the cars with a more interesting provenance to sell in the last few weeks was this 1976 MERCEDES-BENZ 450 SEL SEDAN 6.9 which was once owned by famous French he collection includes a 1977 Mercedes 450 SEL 6.9, that was originally owned by famous French singer and composer, Claude François. It is the car in which he famously survived an attempted assassination in 1977. Claude, or CloClo to his fans, was one of France's biggest pop stars, with a legacy that continues today as he continues to be one of the country's biggest-selling recording artists. Claude famously wrote and composed the original version of 'My Way', a song made internationally famous by Frank Sinatra. The car sold for € 92,000 ($103,665) and can be seen at the auction page complete with bullet holes (which had subsequently been repaired).Throughout his career Claude sold some 70 million records,
This ultra-rare 1954 Bugatti Type 101C Coupe with coachwork by Antem was one of the last cars built by the original family-owned Bugatti. It’s province includes such names as casino-magnate Bill Harrah and actor Nicholas Cage, and was estimated to sell for between $1.7 and 2.0 million at Bonham's Chantilly sale. It failed to meet reserve.
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This ultra-rare 1954 Bugatti Type 101C Coupe with coachwork by Antem was one of the last cars built by the original family-owned Bugatti. It’s province includes such names as casino-magnate Bill Harrah and actor Nicholas Cage, and was estimated to sell for between $1.7 and 2.0 million at Bonham's Chantilly sale. It failed to meet reserve.
This ultra-rare 1954 Bugatti Type 101C Coupe with coachwork by Antem was one of the last cars built by the original family-owned Bugatti. It’s province includes such names as casino-magnate Bill Harrah and actor Nicholas Cage, and was estimated to sell for between $1.7 and 2.0 million at Bonham's Chantilly sale. It failed to meet reserve.
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This ultra-rare 1954 Bugatti Type 101C Coupe with coachwork by Antem was one of the last cars built by the original family-owned Bugatti. It’s province includes such names as casino-magnate Bill Harrah and actor Nicholas Cage, and was estimated to sell for between $1.7 and 2.0 million at Bonham's Chantilly sale. It failed to meet reserve.
This 1925 Lorraine-Dietrich B3-6 Le Mans Roadster Sport finished third in the 1925 24 Hours of Le Mans. It was expected to sell for between $680,000 and $1.1 million but failed to meet reserve.
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This 1925 Lorraine-Dietrich B3-6 Le Mans Roadster Sport finished third in the 1925 24 Hours of Le Mans. It was expected to sell for between $680,000 and $1.1 million but failed to meet reserve.
This 1925 Lorraine-Dietrich B3-6 Le Mans Roadster Sport finished third in the 1925 24 Hours of Le Mans. It was expected to sell for between $680,000 and $1.1 million but failed to meet reserve.
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This 1925 Lorraine-Dietrich B3-6 Le Mans Roadster Sport finished third in the 1925 24 Hours of Le Mans. It was expected to sell for between $680,000 and $1.1 million but failed to meet reserve.
A car with a complete history from new, this 1938 Bugatti Type 57 two-three seater drophead coupe was created by respected Belgian coachbuilder Albert D'Ieteren, and was once owned by famous French artist, André Derain, one of the leaders of the Fauvism movement along with Henri Matisse. It sold in Paris at Bonham's new Château de Chantilly sale for €1,265,000 ( $1,410,477).
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A car with a complete history from new, this 1938 Bugatti Type 57 two-three seater drophead coupe was created by respected Belgian coachbuilder Albert D'Ieteren, and was once owned by famous French artist, André Derain, one of the leaders of the Fauvism movement along with Henri Matisse. It sold in Paris at Bonham's new Château de Chantilly sale for €1,265,000 ( $1,410,477).
A car with a complete history from new, this 1938 Bugatti Type 57 two-three seater drophead coupe was created by respected Belgian coachbuilder Albert D'Ieteren, and was once owned by famous French artist, André Derain, one of the leaders of the Fauvism movement along with Henri Matisse. It sold in Paris at Bonham's new Château de Chantilly sale for €1,265,000 ( $1,410,477).
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A car with a complete history from new, this 1938 Bugatti Type 57 two-three seater drophead coupe was created by respected Belgian coachbuilder Albert D'Ieteren, and was once owned by famous French artist, André Derain, one of the leaders of the Fauvism movement along with Henri Matisse. It sold in Paris at Bonham's new Château de Chantilly sale for €1,265,000 ( $1,410,477).
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
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Already the subject of a feature article on this site, the 1972 Maserati Boomerang Cut is a unique, fully functional concept car and one of the best recognised car of the seventies thanks to the worldwide publicity it created at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. Beyond being fully functional, it's also road registered, so it's not surprising that the instantly recognisable one-off is appreciating at a substantial rate. It has only once before sold at public auction when it was sold by Christies in Paris in 2005 and fetched €781,250 (US$1,007,005). A decade later, it fetched €3,335,000 ($3,718,529) at Bonham's first Chantilly sale.
Two Ferraris which both sold at RM-Sotheby's London auction. The most expensive car of the week was the 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti and the 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti was the third most expensive of the 14 cars sold in eight days
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Two Ferraris which both sold at RM-Sotheby's London auction. The most expensive car of the week was the 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti and the 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti was the third most expensive of the 14 cars sold in eight days
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
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Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
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Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
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Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
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Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
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Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
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Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
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Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Anyone with refined petroleum running through their veins will recognise the silver Aston Martin DB5 as one of the most successful celluloid product placements in history, with all the right brand values emphasised in the James Bond film Goldfinger. This DB5 is one of the 65 DB5 Vantages produced with the higher 390 horsepower engine, and one of approximately 40 produced as a right-hand drive model. Though its history is not well recorded, this 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Vantage spent most of its existence in Germany, and was sold in highly original condition for £784,000 ($1,197,915)
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Anyone with refined petroleum running through their veins will recognise the silver Aston Martin DB5 as one of the most successful celluloid product placements in history, with all the right brand values emphasised in the James Bond film Goldfinger. This DB5 is one of the 65 DB5 Vantages produced with the higher 390 horsepower engine, and one of approximately 40 produced as a right-hand drive model. Though its history is not well recorded, this 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Vantage spent most of its existence in Germany, and was sold in highly original condition for £784,000 ($1,197,915)
Anyone with refined petroleum running through their veins will recognise the silver Aston Martin DB5 as one of the most successful celluloid product placements in history, with all the right brand values emphasised in the James Bond film Goldfinger. This DB5 is one of the 65 DB5 Vantages produced with the higher 390 horsepower engine, and one of approximately 40 produced as a right-hand drive model. Though its history is not well recorded, this 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Vantage spent most of its existence in Germany, and was sold in highly original condition for £784,000 ($1,197,915)
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Anyone with refined petroleum running through their veins will recognise the silver Aston Martin DB5 as one of the most successful celluloid product placements in history, with all the right brand values emphasised in the James Bond film Goldfinger. This DB5 is one of the 65 DB5 Vantages produced with the higher 390 horsepower engine, and one of approximately 40 produced as a right-hand drive model. Though its history is not well recorded, this 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Vantage spent most of its existence in Germany, and was sold in highly original condition for £784,000 ($1,197,915)
Anyone with refined petroleum running through their veins will recognise the silver Aston Martin DB5 as one of the most successful celluloid product placements in history, with all the right brand values emphasised in the James Bond film Goldfinger. This DB5 is one of the 65 DB5 Vantages produced with the higher 390 horsepower engine, and one of approximately 40 produced as a right-hand drive model. Though its history is not well recorded, this 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Vantage spent most of its existence in Germany, and was sold in highly original condition for £784,000 ($1,197,915)
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Anyone with refined petroleum running through their veins will recognise the silver Aston Martin DB5 as one of the most successful celluloid product placements in history, with all the right brand values emphasised in the James Bond film Goldfinger. This DB5 is one of the 65 DB5 Vantages produced with the higher 390 horsepower engine, and one of approximately 40 produced as a right-hand drive model. Though its history is not well recorded, this 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Vantage spent most of its existence in Germany, and was sold in highly original condition for £784,000 ($1,197,915)
Anyone with refined petroleum running through their veins will recognise the silver Aston Martin DB5 as one of the most successful celluloid product placements in history, with all the right brand values emphasised in the James Bond film Goldfinger. This DB5 is one of the 65 DB5 Vantages produced with the higher 390 horsepower engine, and one of approximately 40 produced as a right-hand drive model. Though its history is not well recorded, this 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Vantage spent most of its existence in Germany, and was sold in highly original condition for £784,000 ($1,197,915)
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Anyone with refined petroleum running through their veins will recognise the silver Aston Martin DB5 as one of the most successful celluloid product placements in history, with all the right brand values emphasised in the James Bond film Goldfinger. This DB5 is one of the 65 DB5 Vantages produced with the higher 390 horsepower engine, and one of approximately 40 produced as a right-hand drive model. Though its history is not well recorded, this 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Vantage spent most of its existence in Germany, and was sold in highly original condition for £784,000 ($1,197,915)
Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
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Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
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Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
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Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
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Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
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Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
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Given the quality and rarity of the EB110, and the spectacular first and third iterations of the Bugatti company, the EB110 will certainly become a million dollar car sooner or later, with this 1995 Bugatti EB110 Super Sport setting a world record for the marque at £627,200 ($958,332).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
This 1929 Bentley 4½-litre Sports Saloon (Lot 171) with coachwork by H J Mulliner sold for GBP£695,900 ($1,062,691) at Bonhams' Beaulieu Sale on September 5.
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This 1929 Bentley 4½-litre Sports Saloon (Lot 171) with coachwork by H J Mulliner sold for GBP£695,900 ($1,062,691) at Bonhams' Beaulieu Sale on September 5.
This 1929 Bentley 4½-litre Sports Saloon (Lot 171) with coachwork by H J Mulliner sold for GBP£695,900 ($1,062,691) at Bonhams' Beaulieu Sale on September 5.
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This 1929 Bentley 4½-litre Sports Saloon (Lot 171) with coachwork by H J Mulliner sold for GBP£695,900 ($1,062,691) at Bonhams' Beaulieu Sale on September 5.
This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
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This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
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This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
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This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
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This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
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This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
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This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
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This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
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This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
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This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
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This 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage Volante sold at Silverstone Auctions' Salon Prive sale at Blenheim Palace on Friday 4th September. Estimated to sell for GBP£825,000 to GBP£925,000, the car sold for GBP£900,000 (US$1,367,541) including buyers premium.
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
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Auctions America began its extensive catalogue entry for this car with an excerpt from J.L. Elbert's book "Duesenberg: The Mightiest American Motor Car”: “It was a time of solid brass castings and engine-turned aluminum and stainless steel, of natural cowhide and quartered Circassian walnut, of hand-striped canework and whitewall tires white on both sides. Truly it was an honest day for product. Die-castings and synthetics are ubiquitous now. Veneered things are for the many. Those solid things were for the few. Here is a roaring saga out of the opulent Newport era – the Life and Times of an elegant motor car showpiece tailored for that few. Any car, deliberately designed to socially outrank others among patricians and at the same time competitively outdrive (89-mph in second gear) among playboys, would have to have been some automobile. That, Duesenberg was.” Appropriately auctioned in Duesenberg's home town, the history of this 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Murphy is well covered in the auction description, and at $1,402,500, it was "well bought."
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
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This car was one of the last Lussos manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 made. The Ferrari 250 GT/L was first seen at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, fitting between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, combining the best features of both. The Lusso was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Gt?Ls usually sell in the $1.6 million to $2.5 million range, with RM having set the record for the Lusso model at $4.51 million at Monterey in 2008. This 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti sold for £1,232,000 ($1,882,438).
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
100/162
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
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Launched in 1987, the Ferrari F40 was the first road legal production car to break the 200 mph with a top speed of 201.4 mph (324 km/h), making it the world's fastest production car. 1987 was also Enzo Ferrari's 90th birthday, and it was 40 years since he built his first Ferrari automobile so the evolution of the 288 GTO destined for a racing class that was made defunct became a special supercar and the last one "il Commendatore" would see launched. Only 1,311 F40s were produced between 1987 and 1996, and as they come to auction, they now invariably fetch more than a $1,000,000, hence it's not surprising that RM-Sotheby's 1992 Ferrari F40 fetched £845,600 ($1,292,037)
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
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Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
106/162
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
107/162
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
108/162
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
109/162
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
110/162
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
111/162
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
112/162
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
113/162
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
114/162
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
115/162
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).
116/162
Appearing for the first time ever at a public auction, this 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti has a period racing history, and has more recently been campaigned in all the prestigious European Classic events under the ownership of Matthias Ficht. The car fetched GBP£4,760,000 ($7,273,054) at RM-Sotheby's London sale on September 7 (2015).