RFID

  • Traditional batteries are large, contain toxic chemicals, and need to be periodically replaced, meaning they're not ideal for powering medical implants. But new research from MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital has demonstrated a new way to power implanted devices using radio waves.
  • ​You've gotta watch what you eat and drink … but if you need a little help doing so, a new tooth-mounted antenna-like sensor could help. Designed by scientists at Tufts University, it's currently able to track its wearer's intake of glucose, salt and alcohol.
  • Now you can have your wonder material and eat it, too. The lab of James Tour at Rice University has demonstrated a way to etch graphene onto food like bread and potatoes, as well as materials like cardboard and cloth, where it could then act as an RFID tag.
  • Tracking stock in warehouses is a huge challenge for businesses. Lost items reportedly cost American retailers over $45 billion annually, so tech that makes inventory tracking easier has the potential to have a huge impact. A new MIT system could do just that, using drones and RFID tags.
  • ​​For years a subset of the transhumanist community, called “grinders”, has been experimenting with implanting electronics and microchips into their bodies. Now a tech company based in Wisconsin is set to offer all its employees the option of having a microchip implanted in their hands.​
  • ​​So, you don't like folding laundry or wearing wrinkly clothes. Well, the ThreadRobe may be what you're looking for. This wardrobe-on-steroids helps you select outfits based on the clothes that are casually tossed into it, then delivers those items to you freshly-steamed.​
  • Though some luggage now has integrated location tracking, the vast majority, of course, do not. US airline Delta, however, is making it possible for anyone to track their luggage, no matter how low-tech it may be, using its Fly Delta app.
  • A new radio technology dubbed "Braidio" has the potential to dramatically extend the battery life of mobile devices by many hundreds of times by allowing them to automatically share battery power loads with other devices when wirelessly communicating.
  • By combining technologies that already exist in one form or another into one backpack, the Klifit – now raising funds on Kickstarter – aims to keep you organized, charged and secure.​​
  • If some reckless reader has put a book back in the wrong spot, it's a daunting task for librarians to search the entire building for it. Researchers are now designing robots that can navigate through libraries at night, scanning spines and shelves to report back on missing or out-of-place books.​​
  • In the past we’ve seen paper - one of the most ubiquitous materials around - used to create origami batteries and even diagnostic tools. Now, researchers have used it as the basis of what they call PaperID, a project that uses simple RFID tags to add smart functionality.
  • To make radio frequency identification (RFID) chips a bit more secure, MIT and Texas Instruments are developing an "unhackable" RFID chip that's designed to fend off information-stealing attacks.​