Motorcycles

Husqvarna reveals electric mobility plans with E-Pilen concept

Husqvarna reveals electric mob...
The E-Pilen electric motorcycle concept ushers in a new all-electric mobility range from Husqvarna
The E-Pilen electric motorcycle concept ushers in a new all-electric mobility range from Husqvarna
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Rear view of the E-Pilen concept motorcycle, showing the angular "fuel tank" inspired by the company's existing Vitpilen and Svartpilen engined motorc
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Rear view of the E-Pilen concept motorcycle, revealing the wide angular "fuel tank" inspired by the company's existing Vitpilen and Svartpilen engined motorcycles
Photo shoot lighting designed to tease, not reveal, details on the E-Pilen electric motorcycle concept
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Photo shoot lighting designed to tease, not reveal, details on the E-Pilen electric motorcycle concept
Front-on view shows the wide handlebar and rounded headlamp, as well as offering a better look at the sculpted "fuel tank" that's home to the e-moto's removable batteries
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Front-on view shows the wide handlebar and rounded headlamp, as well as offering a better look at the sculpted "fuel tank" that's home to the e-moto's removable batteries
The E-Pilen electric motorcycle concept ushers in a new all-electric mobility range from Husqvarna
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The E-Pilen electric motorcycle concept ushers in a new all-electric mobility range from Husqvarna
View gallery - 4 images

Way back in 2011, Swedish/Austrian motorcycle maker Husqvarna had an idea for a lightweight single-track commuter called the Concept E-go, but waited until 2019 before first stepping into electric mobility with the EE 5 electric minibike. Now the company has signaled an upcoming all-electric range with the E-Pilen electric motorcycle concept.

Husqvarna says that its latest e-moto concept has been inspired by the designs of the company's Vitpilen and Svartpilen ranges of ICE motorcycles, sporting an upright riding stance and similarly sculpted "fuel tank" that's home to the E-Pilen's battery modules.

The teaser video shows three battery modules secured in the enclosure, and each can be removed for charging indoors or hotswapped for fresh ones (and could even take advantage of the combined efforts of KTM, Honda, Yamaha and Piaggio for such things). Capacity figures haven't been given, but the company reckons that riders can expect up to 100 km (62 miles) per charge – making the E-Pilen a city or urban commuter to challenge the likes of Sondors and Super Soco, rather than motoring with more capable beasts like the Harley Livewire.

Performance specs are sadly lacking too, but the concept features a mid-mounted 8-kW in-house motor and chain drive. The company says that riders can expect the new bikes to retain the "progressive, smart, dynamic and purely design-oriented" values displayed in its existing non-electric street models, and the concept shows a KTM-like trellis frame, monoshock rear suspension, rounded headlamp, wide handlebar, and five-spoke wheels.

The E-Pilen is just a taste of what Husqvarna has in mind for its upcoming e-mobility line, which will be supported by an expanded dealer presence in urban and metropolitan areas.

And that's about all we know for now. Have a look at the short video below while we wait for further details to emerge.

E-Pilen Concept | Husqvarna Motorcycles

Source: Husqvarna

View gallery - 4 images
3 comments
Daishi
I'm sure a lot of people will dig the retro look but for me I think I prefer something closer to Yamaha's PES1 electric bike concept that pushes the battery to a lower center of gravity ( https://newatlas.com/yamaha-electric-bikes-release-2015/31983/ ). It seems like Husqvarna went with that design because the battery packs are meant to be swapped out from the top. It's possible to make swappable batteries lower in the chassis using something like the design of the MotoCzysz E1pc of early TT Zero fame. Either way I commend the effort but I'm not expecting electric motorcycles to start filling up the streets around me for a long while.
Pmeon
Has anyone ever questioned why motorbikes have 17 inch rims while mountain bikes have 29er wheels?
You can't say it's handling because a mountain bike can turn much tighter than any motorbike. You can't say it's high speed stability because anyone who has ridden a small wheel scooter on a freeways knows all about that.
The answer is the motorbike needs room to fit a gasoline engine and gearbox. For a fixed wheelbase that space needs to come out of the wheel diameter.
An electric motorbike doesn't have that restriction, so why do designers persist with making electric motorbikes look like internal combustion bikes?
Maybe they are afraid to think.
nick101
Seeing how electric bikes don't have to follow 'the rules', why not have motors in the hubs and the battery pack as low as possible where a gasoline engine would be?