Sport

  • ​​Hovercrafts, scooters, skateboards and jetpacks. We've seen some pretty out-there ideas when it comes to how golfers can make their way across the links. A new electrified pushbike might not be the most exciting of the bunch, but it may have practicality on its side.
  • ​A newly published study has provided further evidence linking participation in American football with a degenerative neurological condition called Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), which is thought to be triggered by repeated blows to the head.
  • Smart technology has given amateur and professional sportspeople access to a huge array of data. The latest suite of smart gear from Intel is focused on delivering more info to cricket players and fans alike, with plans to bring drones, virtual reality and a bat sensor to life later this year.
  • Motoring power wars have escalated to the point where the average hot hatch is able to break most speed limits in less than six seconds. According to Hyundai, the solution is warm cars like the Elantra SR Turbo. It isn't too cold, and it isn't too hot – the SR Turbo aims for the goldilocks zone.
  • A Danish inventor has come up with a way to get his kids moving around again – by making them punch each other. Jabii pits kids against each other in a hybrid of virtual and real world combat, using padded extendable gloves connected via Bluetooth to an app that tracks hits and scores.
  • Indoor climbing walls don’t always capture the nuances of nature, so researchers developed a way to bring the outdoors in. Rather than recreate an entire rock formation, they made models of the key parts of the geometry and arranged them on an artificial wall to replicate the real thing.
  • The Shft IQ, currently on Kickstarter, is a virtual running coach which works with your smartphone to give real-time voice coaching. The foot- or chest-worn device uses an array to running metrics to give advice on how to improve your technique and run faster and longer.
  • Golf club memberships are expensive, and people in areas where it gets really cold are unable to play for a huge chunk of the year. One way to get around the problem could be simple simulations like R-Motion, which relies on a small clip attached to the shaft of the club.
  • Building soccer pitches isn't typically a priority in London's limited space, so architect AL_A has devised a way to make the most of the spaces that are available. Its Pitch/Pitch concept can fit multiple five-a-side soccer pitches on small disused plots by stacking them on top of each other.
  • For many people nowadays, a workout isn’t a workout unless it’s tracked, logged and shared. But with so many fitness tracking devices available, it can be hard to choose the right one. Here we look at some of the best activity and fitness trackers available in 2016.
  • We've seen machines playing ping pong before, but artist Mark Wheeler has got ping pong playing machines. He's harnessed the game's metronomic regularity, or lack thereof, and created a sound system with a tempo that's set by the back and forth of a rally.
  • Aspiring baseball pitchers have been added to the list of people who can benefit from ball tracking technology. Rapsodo opens the door for the measurement of spin, velocity and trajectory.