bike lights

  • We've already seen plenty of bicycle tail lights that double as brake lights and turn indicators, but the G-Light offers a handy extra feature – its turn indicator automatically switches off as soon as you've completed a turn, just like on a car.
  • ​When mountain bikers ride at night, they usually go with two headlights – one on the bars to illuminate the trail that's straight ahead, and one on their helmet to light up the part of the trail that's around the next curve. The Hydra 3, however, is claimed to make the helmet light unnecessary.
  • ​For years now, Denmark's Reelight has manufactured battery-free bike lights that are powered by wheel-mounted magnets. What if you don't want to put magnets on your spokes, though? Well, that's where the company's new eddy current-powered Nova lights come in.
  • ​Three years ago, we reviewed a nifty li'l cycling product known as WingLights – LED turn indicators that magnetically attach to the ends of one's handlebars. Well, British startup Cycl is back again, with its new-and-improved WingLights360.
  • ​If you cycle with multiple lights on your bike, then you may find that repeatedly turning them all on and off can be a bit of a hassle. Well, that's where the new CatEyeSYNC system comes in. It lets you wirelessly synchronize and control up to seven lights at once, via your smartphone.
  • ​It's important to use bike lights if you ride at night, but not everyone wants them cluttering up their handlebars, nor do they always remember to attach them when heading out before dark. Well, that's why Licht was created. It's a set of handlebar grips with multi-function lights.
  • ​As technology advances, there are more and more electronic gadgets that take up space on a bike's handlebars. Refactor Fitness' RF-1 is designed to simplify things, as it combines a GPS cycling computer, dual headlights and an HD camera in one device.
  • Two years ago, Swiss company Velohub took to Kickstarter to finance production of its Blinkers bicycle lighting system. This March, the product became available for regular purchase, and we recently got to try it for ourselves. Our verdict? It's everything you could possibly want in a bike light.
  • ​If you're a bicycle commuter, then it's entirely likely that you regularly encounter a pothole, etc that makes you say "Why doesn't the city DO something about this?". Well, first they have to know about it – and the Flare headlight is designed to tell them.
  • It's called the Lucnt (pronounced "lucent") and what is it? It's an accelerometer-equipped bike tail light that's made from a single block of aircraft-grade aluminum, and it does more than you might expect.
  • ​You've seen those little LEDs that can be fastened to a bicycle's spokes, that create a ring of light when the wheel is spinning. While they do make the bike more visible at night, they're one more thing that needs batteries. Arara wheel lights, however, are powered by magnets.
  • ​It was a couple of years ago that New Atlas first tried out Magnic Light iC, a no-contact bike lighting system that doesn't involve batteries, tire-rubbing dynamos or wheel-mounted magnets. Now, inventor Dirk Strothmann is back with Magnic Microlights.