Ergonomic

  • Some jobs on Ford's automotive assembly lines require workers to be constantly reaching overhead, and a whole day of doing so can really take a toll on the body. That's why the motor company has recently partnered with Ekso Bionics to trial an upper-body exoskeleton known as the EksoVest.
  • According to cycling ergonomics expert Sean Madsen, bicycle handlebar grips actually work better if they're flat on top. It also helps if they're narrow at the end, and have "wings." The resulting product, named for the manner in which a sushi cone is held, is called Sushi Grips.​
  • ​​As anyone who has stocked shelves in a big-box retail store knows, there's a lot of squatting and heavy lifting involved – injuries can and do occur. That's why hardware chain Lowe's has collaborated with Virginia Tech to create a new lift-assist exoskeleton for use by its employees.
  • Paramedics experience more job-related injuries than workers in almost any other sector. According to research conducted by the University of Waterloo, however, there's a straightforward way of bringing those injury rates down by up to 78 percent: equip paramedics with powered stretchers.​
  • ​Butt discomfort is a common complaint among cyclists, caused at least in part by road vibrations being transmitted up the frame and into the saddle. The Rinsten Spring addresses that problem, in the form of a steel spring that's installed between the saddle and seatpost.
  • As more research is revealed about the health detriments of sitting all day, an increasing number of companies is looking for ways to get us up out of our chairs. One of the more recent entries to this market is the Edge Desk, which we got our hands – and knees – on to review.
  • ​​Earlier this year, suitX announced what it claimed was the world's most affordable mobility exoskeleton, the Phoenix. Designed for disabled users, it utilizes motors to move their legs for them. Now, the company has unveiled a product that could make a lot of other peoples' lives easier.
  • ​Because diabetics often lack feeling in their feet, it is vitally important that they have footwear that fits. That's why they frequently get custom orthopedic insoles made for their shoes. Now, it's looking like 3D printing could make those insoles even better.
  • There are a variety of ways to combat blue light including apps, screen filters and phone settings, such as Apple's "night shift" mode. We recently had a chance to try one of them in the form of a pair of eye glasses from GlassesUSA kitted out with the company's exclusive "digital block lenses."
  • ​​​It was in 2010 that we first heard about a set of ergonomic wheelchair wheels that let users move their chairs forward by pulling back on the handrims. Six years later, the technology has moved from prototype to product, with the Rowheels REV-LX wheelset recently hitting the market.​
  • ​Everybody's butt is unique. It would only seem logical, then, that an "off-the-rack" bicycle saddle isn't going to deliver an optimum fit. That's where Meld enters the picture. It's a saddle that's manufactured using a posterior impression that the buyer sends in. ​
  • The International Living Futures Institute has awarded the first full certifications for its Living Product Challenge standard to a desk chair and a sit/stand desk. The scheme recognizes products that are sustainably produced, improve our quality of life, are beautifully designed and functional.